Category Archives: Helpful Supplements

March 2016 Newsletter – March on Minerals!

March on Minerals!
Hard to believe it is March 1, especially as I look out my window and see some snow coming down! Fortunately it does not look like the 4-8 inches that they were predicting last night!

In a couple of weeks the NCAA’s March Madness begins – several crazy weeks of college basketball coming up! On the theme of madness and crazy this month’s newsletter looks at minerals. Why? Certain minerals are calming to the nervous system. They’ll help us cope with the pressure of how our bracket is doing in the office pool!

But in all seriousness, minerals are essential to our life. While minerals in general are involved in all our functions there are specific minerals that are utilized by specific endocrine glands. See below for the minerals and glands pairings.

The only way to get minerals is to eat them! Our bodies do not make them. Please enjoy the articles below on the importance of minerals.


Magnesium and Calcium: Are You Deficient?

We hear a lot about the importance of calcium and magnesium to our health. I’ve attended several seminars recently where this was emphasized. One presenter said he checks for calcium, magnesium, and other minerals on all his clients. Why are minerals so important to us? They assist the body in energy production – minerals contain no calories or energy. They work with vitamins and enzymes to fuel all our metabolic processes. Our health cannot be optimized if these processes are impaired.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=675

Links to Additional Articles on Minerals

Here’s some additional articles on minerals:
The Three Minerals You Need to Balance Your Nervous System: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=33

Know Your Nutrients – A Few More Important Minerals: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=154

Minerals for A Strong Immune System: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=161

Minerals for Healthy Bones: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=168

Minerals and Glands
As mentioned above specific minerals are essential to the proper functioning of specific glands in the body. Here is a list:
Pituitary Gland – Manganese
Thyroid Gland – Iodine
Pancreas – Chromium
Adrenal Gland – Copper
Prostate Gland and Uterus – Zinc
Testicles and Ovaries – Selenium

For more information on the endocrine glands here’s the link to the page that links to all my previous articles: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?cat=11

For more information on the prostate gland here’s two articles:
Healthy Prostate Part 1: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=265

Healthy Prostate Part 2: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=264

Magnesium and Calcium: Are You Deficient?

We hear a lot about the importance of calcium and magnesium to our health. I’ve attended several seminars recently where this was emphasized. One presenter said he checks for calcium, magnesium, and other minerals on all his clients. Why are minerals so important to us? They assist the body in energy production – minerals contain no calories or energy. They work with vitamins and enzymes to fuel all our metabolic processes. Our health cannot be optimized if these processes are impaired.

In the month of February we think of Valentine’s Day and hopefully heart health. Magnesium and calcium are two of the most important minerals for a healthy heart and cardiovascular system.

Another presenter stated that 74% of the US population is deficient in magnesium. In preparing for this article, a quick Google search reveals another website saying 80%. Quick searches state similar high numbers for calcium deficiency.

Why so much deficiency? My answer is simple. Minerals come from plants that are grown in healthy mineral rich soil or from animals that ate plants that are grown in this soil. The first problem is that plants (vegetables) are under-consumed in most American diets. The second problem is that most of the plants are grown in nutrient depleted soil. There are many studies showing the significant drop in the vitamin content of our vegetables and fruits compared to pre-1950 levels. And the third problem is that most of the animals are not eating healthy plants!

My last article described the healthiest foods to eat. If you missed it, you can find it on my blog The Road to Better Health Starts with Food: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=661.

Now, let’s take a closer look at these two essential minerals.

Magnesium

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals to the body. It is needed for over 300 different bodily processes. Magnesium aids in enzyme activation. Enzymes make everything happen in the body!

It helps metabolize blood sugar and produce cortisone. Keeping your blood sugar levels under control is the key to health! Another important role of magnesium is to support healthy nerve and muscle function. It works with calcium to keep the nerves firing and the muscles moving! It is involved in nerve signal transmission, muscle contraction, and heart rhythm. Along with calcium and phosphorus it is one of the 18 nutrients critical to forming and maintaining bones and teeth.

Magnesium helps prevent heart attacks by regulating the neuromuscular activity of the heart and maintaining normal heart rhythm. It helps prevent calcium deposits, kidney stones, and gallstones. Magnesium is needed for proper Calcium and Vitamin C metabolism. And, it has been found to aid in bowel regularity.

A shortage of magnesium can show up in a variety of emotional symptoms such as nervousness, tension, and confusion. On a physical level it can result in tremors, muscular excitability, gallstones, kidney stones, or constipation. It has also been linked to blood clots in the heart and brain, along with brittle bones.

As you can see, this is definitely something we need to consume! Magnesium is found in many vegetables. The highest amounts are found in artichokes, avocadoes, legumes (black beans, green beans, navy beans, pinto beans), nuts and seeds (cashews, pumpkin seeds, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds), dark green vegetables (broccoli, spinach, Swiss chard), organ meats, seafood (halibut, salmon, shrimp), and tomatoes.

If you drink alcohol or eat a lot of sweets, you need to keep a close watch on your magnesium levels as alcohol and sugar deplete magnesium in the body.

Calcium

Calcium is one of the most talked about minerals and for good reason. It supports strong bone structure, teeth, and muscle tissue, aids in blood clotting function, supports cardiovascular and nerve functions, and helps in normal functioning of many enzymes. We often hear about calcium deficiencies in conjunction with osteoporosis. As mentioned above it is one of the 18 nutrients required to build bones.

What else contributes to our calcium shortages? Would you believe soft drink (soda) consumption? The reason is that phosphorus is added to them. Phosphorus and calcium need to be in a specific relationship in our body. So, when we take in excessive phosphorus and don’t have sufficient calcium intakes, our body must take it from a storage location. You guessed it – the bones!

The best sources of calcium are of course from food. It is also a misconception that this has to come from milk. Leafy green vegetables are a great source of calcium. For calcium choose: bone meal, cheese (best are Cheddar, mozzarella, and Swiss), collard greens, flaxseed, liver, milk, molasses, mustard greens, sesame seeds, spinach, turnip greens, wheat germ and yogurt.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Nutrients for a Healthy Heart: Part 3 – Toning the Heart

As mentioned in previous articles rate, rhythm, and tone are the key measurements of heart health. Rate is the speed at which the heart beats. This is influenced by the autonomic nervous system and two key minerals: potassium and phosphorus. Rhythm refers to how blood moves through the vasculature. This is influenced by the integrity of the vasculature tissues, electrical signaling and by the mineral calcium. Rate and rhythm were featured in the two previous articles. Tone refers to the muscular strength of the heart. This is influenced primarily by Vitamins B, C, and E. Tone will be addressed in this article. I will focus on Vitamins B and E as Vitamin C was addressed in a previous article.

Tone is influenced by Vitamin B4. Have you ever heard of it? If I were a betting person I’d say probably not (unless you read my earlier articles about it!). Well perhaps there is a reason. Maybe someone doesn’t want you to know what it is you are missing. This is the vitamin you never heard of because there is no synthetic version. It always and only appears in nature with Vitamin B1. The B1/B4 combination helps keep the heart strong (tone) and converts chemical energy into electrical energy working with calcium for keeping up the heart’s rhythm.

Here’s a little historical background. The discovery of vitamins began in the early 20th Century. One of the leading scientists was Casimir Funk who discovered what he called “vitamines” – short for “vital amines” or chemicals that were vital for life. The vitamins were named sequentially and initially associated with a specific deficiency condition. Vitamin A was for night blindness, B for beriberi, C for scurvy, and D for rickets.

Initially, each vitamin was thought to be its own unique substance. Soon it became apparent this was more complex than originally thought. The B family of vitamins began to emerge, now known as the B complex. This family of compounds was found together in nature (real food), but different foods had different mixtures of the compounds. For example wheat germ and liver each contain the B vitamins, but in different proportions.

The B family grew as B1 became Thiamine, B2 Riboflavin, B3 Niacin, B5 Pantothenic acid, B6 known as Pyridoxine, Pyridoxal, and Pyridoxamine, B7 Biotin, B8 Inositol, B9 Folate, and B12 Cobalamin. But what happened to B4? It seems to be missing in the progression. Certainly that is a logical question to ask.

Interestingly enough back in the early days, B4 was referred to as Vitamin D. Remember the common thinking was that all these factors were different and deserving their own unique letter. In fact at this time two different factors were being considered for the fourth vitamin. What we are now calling B4 and what is now officially recognized as D.

Funk was certain that there were these two unique components to the initial vitamin B. Before they started with the subsequent “B” numbers it would have been logical to call it D. Once the B series started it was B4.

Here’s the important part of the story. In nature B1 and B4 are found together in the B complex as described above. With these two factors this B vitamin is the anti-beriberi nutrient. But, there are two kinds of beriberi: “wet” beriberi which affects the cardiovascular system (the heart) and “dry” beriberi which affects the nervous system. B1 (Thiamin) supports the nervous system while B4 supports the heart.

The more easily identified form of beriberi is the “dry”. This leads to paralysis – which is quite evident. Beriberi is Swahili for “I can’t, I can’t.” The “wet” form with its damage to the heart is a longer process and not as immediately evident.

More specifically B4 has two main functions. The first is to maintain muscle tone. As the vitamin becomes deficient muscle tone, particularly of the heart suffers. The second function is to convert chemical energy into electrical energy which fuels the heart. When the heart is starved of electricity it enlarges. With enlargement it also becomes flaccid (lacks muscle tone) and the tissue responds to the forces of gravity by sinking. This pulls the valves and other structures down causing minor leakages, ultimately compounding the heart disease.

If you remember your basic biology ATP is the source of our energy. Adenine, a critical component of ATP, is part of the B4 complex. Adenine alone does not have the ability to make energy. It only works with the rest of the B4 complex.

As you can see – B4 is essential for heart health.

So back to the original question – what happened to B4? Quite simple – B4 is part of the B complex as found in real foods, for example whole grains. When grain is refined (as in white bread and other white flour products) the B4 is removed. And here’s the kicker. B4 cannot be made in the lab. There is no synthetic version – no one can make isolated B4. The food manufacturers cannot add it back to their grain products during their “enrichment” process (of course this is misleadingly called “fortifying” or “enriching”) when they add back other B vitamins such as Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, and Folic Acid.

Due to our modern diets of refined grain products we become deficient in B4 and over time this leads to the enlarging of the heart, minor leakages, damage to the heart, and simultaneously heart disease.

Fortunately the solution is rather simple. Be sure to eat real food products that have their full assortment of vitamins intact. Another option is to supplement, however this must be done with products that are derived from whole foods and contain B4. In my practice I use Standard Process supplements which fit this description.

Vitamin E helps regulate the rate of oxygen burn in the blood which helps with endurance. Low Vitamin E levels will lead to low energy and fatigue.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

April 2015 Newsletter: No April Fool’s Here: Serious Stuff for Your Health

I hope you are enjoying the series of articles based on the book Body by Science. This month’s newsletter features the third installment discussing the all important area of the hormonal impact of exercise. Unfortunately this is one of the most misunderstood aspects of exercise. While exercise has many benefits, improper exercise can create hormone imbalances. Hormones determine and drive most of our body’s functions, thus hormone imbalances can be at the root of many disturbing symptoms. For a refresher on hormones click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?cat=11

One of the best newsletters I receive is from Dr. Bruce West. Each month is packed with valuable information. His February issue was one of the best ever and I wanted to share a few of his nutritional nuggets from that issue. This article follows below.


New stuff in the office: Supplements for pets and water tests.

Did you know that almost 70% of pets in U.S. households are on medications? I was shocked, but I guess not surprised when I read that in an article about Pfizer’s pet drug division. Many of my clients have pets at home and they are just concerned about their pet’s health as their own. Standard Process has an excellent line of pet products, particularly for cats, dogs, and horses. I have several clients who are aware of this and I am able to supply them with product. If you are interested let me know.

Ever wonder if your water supply is safe. I’ve come across some easy do it yourself home water tests from Silver Lake Research. I have in stock the well water test kit ($25) and the city water test kit ($20). For more information on the test kits you can click here: https://www.discovertesting.com/products/display_products_overviews.sd?iid=1&headtitle=Drinking%20Water%20Test%20Kits
If you are interested give me a call or send an email.


Exercise and Hormones: Fat Burning (Yes) and Fat Storing (oh no!)

I have recently introduced you to the book Body by Science by Doug McDuff, MD and John Little. This book offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. The effectiveness of exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism and blood glucose levels. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=21


Nutritional Nuggets from Dr. Bruce West

One of my favorite nutrition publications I get is Health Alert by Dr. Bruce West. Each month I look forward to the latest edition. The official title is Health Alert: When All Other Treatments Fail. I think you get the picture. Dr. West is a Chiropractor and a big fan of Standard Process products. He is also a big fan of the truth. February’s issue was full of juicy nuggets that I’d like to share.

Nugget #1: Almost all treatment for heart disease is unnecessary!

Nugget #2: Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes!

Nugget #3: Heart attacks are not caused by clogged arteries!

Nugget #4: Multiple sclerosis is directly linked to poor gut flora!

To read the complete post click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=19

Nutritional Nuggets from Dr. West’s Health Alert

One of my favorite nutrition publications I get is Health Alert by Dr. Bruce West. Each month I look forward to the latest edition. The official title is Health Alert: When All Other Treatments Fail. I think you get the picture. Dr. West is a Chiropractor and a big fan of Standard Process products. He is also a big fan of the truth. February’s issue was full of juicy nuggets that I’d like to share.

Nugget #1: Almost all treatment for heart disease is unnecessary! Dr. West states that most of the cardiac procedures are all band-aids as they ignore the underlying issue and are unnecessary for 70% of patients. He also cites a study showing five behaviors in men cause 86% of all heart attacks. I’m sure you can pretty much guess what they are: smoking, eating too much, drinking too much, a big stomach (as a result of eating and drinking too much), and being inactive. His conclusion – it’s about lifestyle!

Nugget #2: Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes! A study of mice showed that consuming artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, sucralose (Splenda), and aspartame (Equal, Sweet n low) cause glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes. In the study one group of mice was fed the artificial sweeteners and another group fed sugar. The ones fed sugar did not develop diabetes, just the artificial sweetener group. This was replicated in a small group of healthy human subjects who were placed on a diet containing artificial sweeteners. Within just one week over 50% of the humans developed glucose intolerance!

How does this happen? The artificial sweeteners alter our gut flora in the large intestines which changes our metabolism to favor glucose intolerance. This was proven by transplanting feces from the two groups of mice into germ-free mice. The mice that got the feces from the artificial sweetener fed mice developed diabetes. Not so with the mice getting feces from the sugar fed mice. This proves the artificial sweeteners affected the gut flora and led to glucose intolerance!

Nugget #3: Heart attacks are not caused by clogged arteries! Coronary artery blockages rarely cause heart attacks because of the body’s ability to create its own natural bypass system. Go to the website www.heartattacknew.com and see for yourself what the body does on its own! What really causes heart attacks are imbalances in the autonomic nervous system and nutrient deficiencies (particularly B-complex deficiencies – see my article on Vitamin B4 – click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=38.


Nugget #4:
Multiple sclerosis is directly linked to poor gut flora! MS is an autoimmune disease and 80% of your immune system is in our gut and its flora. It turns out that the gut microbes in people with MS are different than those without it! The gut flora of MS patients have bacteria that cause inflammation and other MS symptoms and they lack the bacteria that help control inflammation! Once again we see the importance of the health of our gut flora. Remember we have 20,000 genes. The bacteria in our gut has 1,000,000 genes!

November 2014 Newsletter – Probiotics: Trick or Treat?

An early Happy Thanksgiving to everyone and the beginning of the Holiday Season. This is an especially important time to be mindful of what you are eating and drinking as with all the festivities it can easily get away from us!

Digestion is one of my favorite topics and that is the focus of this month’s newsletter. Many of my clients suffer from a variety of digestive issues – in fact it is the largest segment of my practice – from gas, bloating, and occasional heart burn; to constipation, diarrhea, and acid reflux; and then on to IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, Celiac, and diverticulitis.

In my late teens, through college, and into my mid-thirties I too suffered with digestive issues. I was diagnosed with IBS and the “solution” was to eat more fiber. That didn’t really work. As I began to learn more about healthy eating it turned out to be a relatively simple fix – stop eating bagels and cereals for breakfast – and soon my digestion was vastly improved and my seasonal asthma was gone!

One of the solutions for digestive ailments that we often hear is to take probiotics. And, there is an underlying assumption that the more we take, the better. But is this the whole story? Read below and see!

This past weekend I attended a special event for Standard Process’s top accounts from across the country. It was an honor to be there and to meet other like minded practitioners. Needless to say I came away with more ideas to share. One of the more interesting presentations was on a new product called NutriSync. It matches your genes with the nutrients you should be eating to maximize your genetic expression. I’m going to do it this month to get firsthand experience and plan to offer it in January – sounds like a great New Year’s Resolution.

Next month brings us to the heart of the Holiday Season and its parties, foods, and drinks. For many people this means additional stress! This challenges our nervous system. Next month’s feature article will look at the three key minerals to keeping your nervous system balanced.

Without further ado, here’s the heart of the newsletter!


Probiotics: Do You Need Them or Not?

To say we are only as good as our digestion may be an understatement. You can eat the healthiest of foods, but if you are not digesting them, you are not getting the nutrients that your body requires for long term health.

It is likely you are familiar with the three classes of foods that need to be digested – protein, carbohydrates, and fats. However, it is less likely you are familiar with the “triad of digestion” or the three essential substances produced in your body necessary for strong digestion – hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and bile. Hydrochloric acid and lactic acid are as their names indicate – acids, while bile is an alkaline substance.

To continue reading this article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=35

I’d also highly encourage you to read my past articles on digestion:

It’s All About The Gut and the Gut Balance Program click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=53

The Mouth – Why Chewing is Important click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=132

The Importance of Enzymes click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=129

The Stomach click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=127

The Importance of Hydrochloric Acid click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=124

The Small Intestines click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=123

The Liver, Gall Bladder, and Pancreas – Behind the Scenes Helpers of Digestion click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=121

The Large Intestines and the Importance of Probiotics click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=120

Digestion What to Do? A Self Help Guide click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=118

Nutrition Made Simple – A New Blog Series

I’m pleased to announce a new weekly Blog series I’m calling “Nutrition Made Simple.” My tendency is to write longer articles with detailed explanations. It has come to my attention that some clients also like “short and sweet.” So, I will start offer these short blogs that get right to the point – Nutrition Made Simple. My goal is one blog per week on Thursdays. Topics will include:

1. Why sugar is bad for you

2. Why artificial sweeteners are bad for you

3. Why trans-fats are bad for you

4. Why saturated fat is good for you

5. Why you need cholesterol

6. Why protein is important

7. Why you need the right kind of stomach acid

8. Why you want to hang on to your gall bladder

9. How prolonged stress impacts the body

10. What specific vitamins do and where to get them

The Three Minerals You Need to Balance Your Nervous System – The Importance of Phosphorus, Potassium, and Calcium

The nervous system has two main components: the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral nervous system (PNS). The central nervous system consists of the brain and the spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system is what connects the rest of the body to the central nervous system. There are three types of peripheral nerves: autonomic (involuntary nerves), somatic (voluntary nerves), and sensory nerves.

For our purposes here we will focus on the autonomic nervous system (ANS) – sometimes thought of as the “automatic nervous system.” That is because what it controls are for the most part involuntary activities. It will conduct nerve impulses from the central nervous system to cardiac muscle, smooth muscle, and glandular epithelial muscle. To put in plain English – it tells our heart to beat, our digestive system to move food along, the endocrine glands to produce hormones, and for us to breathe.

The autonomic nervous system has two components: the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the parasympathetic nervous system (PSNS). During our normal daily affairs we will switch back and forth between the two of them, but it is impossible for them both to be going at the same time.

The sympathetic nervous system serves as the emergency or stress system. Think of the “fight or flight” response. See a tiger, need to run. The parasympathetic nervous system controls our normal, everyday conditions. In an analogy to a car, the sympathetic nervous system is often described as the accelerator, while the parasympathetic system is the brakes. Sometimes after long periods of stress the autonomic nervous system is not performing correctly and we will accelerate when we should brake and brake when we should accelerate.

While our body was designed to handle stress, it was not designed to handle the constant stress that many people experience. Often people do not recognize their own stress level as they erroneously believe they are handling the stress, or it is how they always feel and do not notice a difference. Yet, their body is under constant stress from both conscious and unintended lifestyle and diet choices.

Both our sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems require specific nutrients. The accelerator function of the sympathetic nervous system is controlled by Phosphorus. Phosphorus is energizing – like fire. In fact, it burns immediately when exposed to air! Fortunately our Phosphorus is inside our body!

We are bombarded with messages about the importance of calcium for our bones. Well, without phosphorus all the calcium in the world will not do you much good. In fact, it may cause harm if there is too much calcium and not sufficient phosphorus.

Phosphorus is the second key mineral by content in our bones. It supports healthy bone formation, energy production, cell growth and repair (remember blood cells are made in our bones), collagen synthesis (that’s what helps make the bone), cardiovascular function, and nerve and muscle activity. It is a key part of calcium and sugar metabolism.

Food sources of phosphorus include almonds, brewer’s yeast, eggs, fish (halibut, salmon), glandular meats, lean beef, lentils, liver, milk, peanuts, poultry, pumpkin seeds, wheat bran, and yogurt.

What about potassium? Potassium strengthens the parasympathetic nervous system. It acts like a governor and helps calm the nervous system. It is critical for the ongoing health of every cell in our body. That’s a pretty important job! Along with its partner sodium, the two minerals balance the nutrient and waste exchange of each cell. Potassium is involved in nerve and muscle functioning where it again teams with sodium. It also maintains our body’s fluid balance, electrolyte balance, and pH balance.

Foods containing potassium include: almonds, artichokes, avocado, bananas, beet greens, broccoli, Brussel sprouts, kale, lentils, lima beans, oranges, papaya, pinto beans, prunes, raisins, spinach, sunflower seeds, Swiss chard, tomatoes, wheat germ, winter squash, and yams.

Calcium is one of the most talked about minerals and for good reason. It supports strong bone structure, teeth, and muscle tissue, aids in blood clotting function, supports cardiovascular and nerve functions, and helps in normal functioning of many enzymes. Calcium works in conjunction with Phosphorus and Potassium to balance these important systems.

The best sources of calcium are of course from food. It is also a misconception that this has to come from milk. Leafy green vegetables are a great source of calcium. For calcium choose: bone meal, cheese (best are Cheddar, mozzarella, and Swiss), collard greens, flaxseed, liver, milk, molasses, mustard greens, sesame seeds, spinach, turnip greens, wheat germ and yogurt.

For a more complete look at Phosphorus, Potassium, Calcium, and all other minerals please reference my articles Key Minerals for Healthy Bones by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=168 and Know Your Nutrients – A Few More by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=154.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Nutrition Made Simple – A New Blog Series

I’m pleased to announce a new weekly Blog series I’m calling “Nutrition Made Simple.” My tendency is to write longer articles with detailed explanations. It has come to my attention that some clients also like “short and sweet.” So, I will start offer these short blogs that get right to the point – Nutrition Made Simple – one blog per week on Thursdays. Topics will include:

1. Why sugar is bad for you

2. Why artificial sweeteners are bad for you

3. Why trans-fats are bad for you

4. Why saturated fat is good for you

5. Why you need cholesterol

6. Why protein is important

7. Why you need the right kind of stomach acid

8. Why you want to hang on to your gall bladder

9. How prolonged stress impacts the body

10. What specific vitamins do and where to get them

Probiotics: Do We Need Them or Not?

Digestion is one of my favorite topics. Many of my clients suffer from a variety of digestive issues: from gas, bloating, and occasional heart burn; to constipation, diarrhea, and acid reflux; and then on to IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, Celiac, and diverticulitis. In my late teens, through college, and into my mid-thirties I too suffered with digestive issues. I was diagnosed with IBS and the “solution” was to eat more fiber. That didn’t really work. As I began to learn more about healthy eating it turned out to be a relatively simple fix – stop eating bagels and cereals for breakfast – and soon my digestion was vastly improved and my seasonal asthma was gone!

To say we are only as good as our digestion may be an understatement. You can eat the healthiest of foods, but if you are not digesting them, you are not getting the nutrients that your body requires for long term health.

It is likely you are familiar with the three classes of foods that need to be digested – protein, carbohydrates, and fats. However, it is less likely you are familiar with the “triad of digestion” or the three essential substances produced in your body necessary for strong digestion – hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and bile. Hydrochloric acid and lactic acid are as their names indicate – acids, while bile is an alkaline substance.

Hydrochloric acid is produced in the stomach and primarily responsible for protein digestion. Bile is produced in the liver, concentrated and stored in the gall bladder, and released into the duodenum (small intestine) to enable fat digestion. Lactic acid is made in the colon (large intestine) and finishes up carbohydrate digestion.

The digestion process starts in the stomach as hydrochloric acid sterilizes and breaks food down into liquid. It kills potential pathogens such as bacteria and parasites; prepares calcium, zinc, and Vitamin B12 to be properly utilized; and begins the digestion of proteins. Digestive issues will start when the body does not make or does not have adequate levels of hydrochloric acid. For more information you can reference my articles The Importance of Hydrochloric Acid by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=124 and The Stomach by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=127. The supplements Betaine Hydrochloride and Zypan from Standard Process can increase acidity in the stomach when the body does not make sufficient hydrochloric acid.

While the environment in the stomach needs to be acidic, for the small intestines to do their job, the environment must be slightly alkaline. The gall bladder sends bile into the small intestines where it will help to alkalize the environment by neutralizing the hydrochloric acid coming in from the stomach and it will emulsify fats and oils so they can be properly digested. If the body is not providing sufficient bile there are obvious consequences. For more information you can reference my articles The Liver, Gall Bladder, and Pancreas – Behind the Scenes Helpers of Digestion by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=121 and The Small Intestines by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=123. There are a variety of supplements from Standard Process that support liver and gall bladder functionality including A-F Betafood, Betafood, and Cholacol.

The last stop on the digestion train is the colon. The natural state of the colon is acidic and lactic acid is the key. The “good” in “good bacteria” is their ability to convert carbohydrates into lactic acid. Lactic acid protects the body from pathogenic bacteria, yeast, and fungus and lines the colon, vaginal tract, and skin to protect against overgrowth. When our gut bacteria are mostly of the “bad” bacteria, this does not occur, resulting in gas and bloating, vaginal yeast infections, and skin problems. For more information you can reference my articles The Large Intestine and the Importance of Probiotics by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=120 and It’s All About the Gut by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=53.

This is where the discussion of probiotics comes into play. As I state in the latter article, “Our microbiome is a large, diverse and dynamic population of micro-organisms. During birth and the first two years of life we acquire our “native bacteria.” This comes primarily from our mother from our birth and (hopefully) subsequent breast feeding. Thus, mom’s health and her microbiome are of extreme importance to baby and instrumental in shaping the future health of the child. After this “transient bacteria” is constantly ingested into our body from food, water, air, and if we choose probiotics.”

This means that any Probiotic you are taking is essentially “transient.” This means for it to be effective you need to keep taking it. It is not populating your gut. If you stop, it is likely that the “bad” bacteria, yeast, and fungus will then take over the environment. Perhaps there is another way to address the issue.

There are three main yeasts that we come across in our diet. Baker’s yeast converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide (gas); Brewer’s yeast converts carbohydrates into alcohol (fermentation); and Mycelium yeast converts carbohydrates into lactic acid. Mycelium yeast is found in a supplement from Standard Process called Lactic Acid Yeast. By increasing our consumption of this type of yeast we can increase the lactic acid in our colon which helps prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria, reduces the risk of colon cancer, and crowds out other yeast and fungus while protecting the lining of our colon.

Therefore, we can conclude, that taking a supplement such as Lactic Acid Yeast may actually be more beneficial as it will reduce the “bad” bacteria, yeast, and fungus while creating the natural environment for your own “good” native bacteria to rule the environment.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Supporting Your Immune System or How to Give Your Body Its Best Shot Against Unwanted Viruses (Such as the flu, E68, HPV, or even dare I say Ebola)

I’ll admit right off the top I’m certainly no expert on Ebola, but it seems quite apparent neither are the “experts” be they in the Federal Government (the CDC) or your major medical institutions. And I’m no expert on the latest “new and mysterious” Enterovirus 68 (or E68) virus or the flu or any of the other viruses that wreck havoc on us – Herpes, Epstein-Barr, HPV, etc.

But what I do know is that with all these viruses about us the best way to protect ourselves is with a strong immune system. Without that we are prone to these unwanted invaders.

To best understand our internal immunity we look at the relationship between four important nutrients – Vitamin C, Vitamin D, Ionized Calcium (Calcium in the blood stream), and the essential fatty acids (from here on referred to as Vitamin F).

Vitamin C is known to support the immune system. Among its many functions is to support the adrenal glands and its hormone production. These hormones are involved in boosting the immune system and rallying it to attack the offender.

Vitamin D has many functions. One of its roles is to move Calcium into the blood stream from the tissues.

Vitamin F (the essential fatty acids) also has many functions. One of these is to move Calcium from the blood stream into the tissues.

Calcium has many functions. We tend to think mostly of its role in our bone health and in fact 99% of the body’s calcium is in the bones. However, that remaining 1% is needed to support the immune system and is found in the body’s other tissues.

When Calcium is low in these tissues, it creates an environment that allows viruses to become virulent. Calcium actually attacks foreign invaders in the tissues in a process called the “calcium wave.” Low calcium also triggers high temperature and fevers. As invaders take over the body mobilizes its defenses raising body temperature to help kill them.

Let’s look at an interesting scenario – the polio outbreaks that used to occur in the summer. The story behind this was that all the kids were together playing. But, that doesn’t really make sense as kids are together all year round, and you’d think it would be worse cooped up in school. Now let’s put all the information from above together.

In the summer, kids are playing outside in the Sun. With the Sun blazing down the body increases the amount of Vitamin D it makes. The Vitamin D moves Calcium from the tissues into the blood stream. One of the first ramifications of this to see is sunburn – tissue damage. If the person stays out too long it can even evolve into sunstroke. The relationship between Vitamin D and Vitamin F is now out of balance. The low Calcium level in the tissues leaves the person more susceptible to the virus. One of the solutions is to increase the amount of Vitamin F and to make sure you have sufficient ionized Calcium.

Another virus in the news is the HPV virus. This is the one that has been linked to cervical cancer. As a side note there are some cancer researchers who believe that viruses are at the root of many cancers. Anyways, the incidence of diagnosis of HPV virus peaks at the end of the summer. This provides another connection to the ramifications of increases of Vitamin D without adequate amounts of Vitamin F and Calcium, and likely Vitamin C too.

The best food sources of Vitamin D are: Eggs, fatty fish (mackerel, salmon, sardines, tuna, and trout), liver, and milk products. The best milk product is organic butter. The best supplement source is Cataplex D from Standard Process.

The best food sources of Vitamin F are: flax seeds and flax seed oil, lecithin, seafood (halibut, salmon, scallops, shrimp, snapper, and tuna), sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, walnuts, wheat germ, and winter squash. The best supplement sources are Black Current Seed Oil, Evening Primrose Oil, and Cataplex F from Standard Process.

The best food sources of Vitamin C are: Acerola berries, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cantaloupe, carrots, cauliflower, kiwi, oranges, papaya, red bell peppers, and strawberries. The best supplement sources are Cataplex C and Cataplex A-C-P from Standard Process.

The best food sources of Calcium are: bone meal, cheese (best are Cheddar, mozzarella, and Swiss), collard greens, flaxseed, liver, milk, molasses, mustard greens, sesame seeds, spinach, turnip greens, wheat germ and yogurt. The best supplement sources are Calcium Lactate and Calcifood from Standard Process.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.