Category Archives: Digestion

December 2017 Newsletter: Happy Holidays, The Gut, The Cleanse, and a Flash Sale

Happy Holidays! I hope everyone had a very nice Thanksgiving and is now looking forward to the rest of the Holiday season – Happy Chanukah, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year!

Recently I had a very interesting conversation with one of my clients. She and her husband just completed the 14 Day Cleanse and were both extremely pleased with the results in terms of weight loss and overall health. She asked me, “Do you ever watch Dr. Oz?” I said I did not and somewhat facetiously commented that most of what he talks about I have known for several years. Her reply caught my attention! That may be true for me, but to most clients the information is likely new, and I should talk about it. So, that’s what I’m doing!

Apparently, the latest from Dr. Oz is that your health is all about the condition of your gut. Specifically, what is happening with your personal environment or flora (the bacteria, yeasts, etc. that live in your digestive tract). I’m excited to announce that I now have access to a new stool test called GI-MAP that tells you exactly what is going on in your gut and what to do about it. See below for more details on the test and some articles about the gut.

My next Open House will be in February at my office. The date and time will be announced in the January newsletter. Below is a brief preview of the topic – Quantum Physics and You!! (Hint: How and why the EMF Phone Chips, EMF Key Chains, Food Freshness Card, and Sleep Chips work!)

As we approach the New Year, come January some of you will say, “time for a cleanse!” I will be hosting several one-hour group meetings to learn about cleansing. See below for dates and times and special pricing.

Also, I’m having a FLASH SALE of 20% off Vital Proteins whey protein and bone broth collagen products and a few select others. See below for details. Quantities are limited so product availability will be on a first come first serve basis.

It’s All About the Gut

There is no shortage of health news articles about the importance of the gut and your personal flora. I have touched on that subject several times in the past. I have discussed identification via stool and saliva testing, blood testing, and muscle testing.

Here’s the latest – the GI-MAP™ a DNA Stool Analysis from Diagnostic Solutions Laboratory. The test assesses everyone’s microbiome, identifies healthy and unhealthy microorganisms, and provides a personalized nutritional protocol. The test costs $359 prepaid and may be covered by insurance. You can pick up a test kit from me, you pay the lab directly, and you consult with me regarding the results. For more information on the test click here: http://diagnosticsolutionslab.com/

Here are some of my recent postings on this topic:

What Not to Bring Home from Your Summer Vacation: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=757

Getting Rid of Unwanted Guests: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=767

It’s All About the Gut and the Gut Balance Program: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=53

Preview of Next Open House

Quantum Physics and You – sounds like a very strange title, so what is it all about? At the next Open House, I will be featuring and talking about the wonderful products from Nature’s Frequencies. Many of you are already using them – the EMF Phone Chips, the EMF Key Chain, the Sleep Chip, and the Food Freshness Card – to name a few.

At my last Open House, I joked that I was about to risk my career with a demonstration of the Food Freshness Card. Here is what happened. I have samples of a certain bone broth protein that I was muscle testing on many clients because I was strongly considering selling it. However, it failed every test! I asked a colleague of mine who sells it if she tested it on people and she said yes, but everything that comes into the office is put on the Food Freshness Card. So, I decided to try that first in the privacy of one client, which proved successful, so I took the big chance at the Open House and sure enough it worked again. Once the product was on the Food Freshness Card for a few minutes it passed the muscle test!

There is a lot more information on the Nature’s Frequencies website. You can see independent studies of how food stayed fresh longer using the card and read multiple testimonials. Here’s the website: http://www.naturesfrequencies.com/

To read more about the dangers of EMFs click here:

The book, Zapped by Ann Louise Gittleman – http://annlouise.com/books/zapped/

EMF resources – http://annlouise.com/books/zapped/zapped-resources/

At the next Open House, I will repeat the demonstration and go into more detail as to why these products work and have product specials!! I hope to see you there!

Cleanse Group Meetings

Had a rough Holiday Season or just feel like losing some weight or feeling a bit healthier? Well, there is no better way than to start the New Year off then with a 14-day Cleanse. I have decided to offer three one-hour group meetings for you to come learn about the cleanse and hopefully purchase your own kit. At this meeting I will be specifically discussing the 14-day Cleanse, but the basic principles apply to all the cleanses I offer. As an added incentive you will receive a sample of five protein bars from Designs for Health with each cleanse purchased. These can be used as a healthy snack during the cleanse.

Here are the dates and times of the meetings that will all be held at my office. Please register early as seating is limited at each session.

Thursday, January 4, 2018 at 5:30 PM

Monday, January 8, 2018 at 12:00 PM

Wednesday, January 17, 2018 at 5:30 PM

Flash Sale

I’m having a FLASH SALE of 20% off Vital Proteins products and a few select others. See below for details. Quantities are limited so product availability will be on a first come first serve basis.

Vital Proteins products:

Collagen Whey – Cocoa & Coconut Water

Collagen Whey – Vanilla & Coconut Water

Organic Chicken Bone Broth Collagen

Grass Fed Beef Bone Broth Collagen

Marine Collagen

Other products:

20% off Zgluten – in case you’re planning a gluten overload during the Holiday Season!!

Food Freshness Card – $50

EMF Cell Phone Chips – $10

EMF Key Chain – $35

Thermal Imaging Scans Available December 28

On December 28 from 8:30 AM until 12:00 PM, Jenny Steger from The Longevity Center will again be offering thermal scans at my office. DITI (Digital Infrared Thermal Imaging or Thermography) is a non-invasive diagnostic technique that allows the examiner to visualize and quantify changes in skin surface temperature. An infrared scanning device is used to convert infrared radiation emitted from the skin surface into electrical impulses that are visualized in color on a monitor. This visual image graphically maps the body temperature and is referred to as a thermogram.

To learn more about The Longevity Center and thermography and to set an appointment click here: http://www.longevitythermography.com/index.php.

September 2017 Newsletter: Getting Rid of Unwanted Guests, Detoxification, and September Open House

As we begin the transition from Summer to Fall so follows this month’s newsletter. First is the follow up to last month’s article, What Not to Bring Home from Your Summer Vacation entitled Getting Rid of Unwanted Guests. This article takes a closer look at what may be causing your digestive upset and what to do about it.

The change of seasons is also a great time to change our own internal seasons with a detoxification or purification program featured in the second article.

Detoxification will be further explored at my Open House on September 14 at 7 PM – To Detox or Not, That is the Question.

Due to the overwhelming enthusiasm for the last three events, we have decided to hold this Open House “off campus.” We will be meeting at the American Legion Post 457, 6050 W. Mequon Road, Mequon (across from Piggly Wiggly). As always, we will feature wonderful and healthy food, including soup, salads, and gluten-free desserts. There are separate emails with more information and special offers including discounts on detoxification programs, bone broth protein powders, and RXBARs.

Getting Rid of Unwanted Guests

Last month, we learned why sometimes our digestion does not seem quite right and how we are exposed to and host all sorts of unwanted “guests” within our own bodies. Lots of times when the doctor cannot determine what is wrong with you or they tell you it is in your head, it may likely be these unwanted “guests” – parasites, yeast/fungi/mold, viruses, or bacteria that are taking over your body and creating a variety of symptoms.

This is all fine and good, but several questions remain. First, how do I know if a “guest” is the underlying cause of the symptoms? Second, what type of “guest” is it? And third, how do I get rid of it? All these are critical questions.

It is important to be aware of other causes of digestive distress which fall into three categories: food allergies/sensitivities, structural issues in the digestive tract, and ongoing emotional stress.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=767

To Detox or Not, That is the Question

The other day I came across an alarming study. It showed that 287 toxins were found in the blood of newborn babies. One of them was a breakdown product of DDT, the pesticide that has been banned for over 40 years! Toxins enter our environment from a variety of sources and unfortunately, they can remain there for decades. These toxins enter our body via the air we breathe, the water we drink, the food we eat, and through our skin.

The basic problem we all face is that the world we were designed to live in has changed dramatically. Unfortunately, our bodies have not adapted fast enough to flush out the numerous man-made chemicals, toxins, and pollutants that are present in our daily lives.

Curious about your personal level of toxicity? Click here: http://brwellness.com/docs/toxicity_questionnaire.pdf

Getting rid of these toxins will help you live a longer, healthier life. This detoxification can boost your immune system, clear your mind, balance your hormones, reduce your body fat, and much more.

All detoxification programs are not created equal. You want to be sure to select one that supports the body’s natural two phase detoxification process. This is accomplished providing the nutrients needed to support and balance Phase I and Phase II metabolic pathways.

Come to our Open House on September 14 and learn all about it!

I will be featuring the VegeCleanse-Plus 14 Day Detoxification Program, the Standard Process 21 Day Purification Program, a Gut Detoxification program, and a gallbladder cleanse.

Success Stories

I thought I’d share a couple of recent success stories with you.

—————————————————————————————————————————
Hi Bernie,

After a full blossoming flush eruption in my mouth all day yesterday, I woke up to smooth cheeks! I think we’re making progress and thought you’d care to know 😉

Thanks for your help and I look forward to my next meeting with you.

———————————————————————————————————————————————————-
Thanks very much for sending this, Bernie. I look forward to reading it and sharing with others!

Our family really appreciates all of your help. [Name] has been doing great and your reassuring, thoughtful approach has helped me as well.

Getting Rid of Unwanted “Guests”

In an earlier article, we learned why sometimes our digestion does not seem quite right and how we are exposed to and host all sorts of unwanted “guests” within our own bodies. Lots of times when the doctor cannot determine what is wrong with you or they tell you it is in your head, it may likely be these unwanted “guests” – parasites, yeast/fungi/mold, viruses, or bacteria that are taking over your body and creating a variety of symptoms.

Typical symptoms include: Allergies, anemia, asthma, bloating, chronic fatigue, constipation, Crohn’s disease, diarrhea, enlarged liver or spleen, flu-like symptoms that persist, gas, headaches, immune problems, irritable bowel, unexplained joint and muscle aches, skin problems, sleep disturbances, and teeth grinding can signal parasites, which masquerade so easily as other disorders. Some people will experience secondary gluten and/or lactose intolerance, so add food sensitivities to the list above.

This is all fine and good, but several questions remain. First, how do I know if a “guest” is the underlying cause of the symptoms? Second, what type of “guest” is it? And third, how do I get rid of it? All these are critical questions.

It is important to be aware of other causes of digestive distress which fall into three categories: food allergies/sensitivities, structural issues in the digestive tract, and ongoing emotional stress.

I will use the terms “allergies” and “sensitivities” interchangeably. They are technically not the same, yet they are each specific descriptions of an immune system response. The most common food sensitivities are wheat, gluten, dairy, corn, soy, eggs, nuts, and sugar. Then there are less common ones such as oats, other grains, the nightshade family of vegetables, other fruits, etc. I have seen all kinds of food sensitivities in my clients. And yes, you can be sensitive to a “healthy” food!

There are a variety of testing options to identify food issues: blood tests, saliva tests, and of course muscle testing. Once the underlying cause is identified the solution is simple – avoid the foods that are causing the problem.

Second, there could be structural issues in the digestive tract: insufficient hydrochloric acid, insufficient bile, lack of a gall bladder, acid/alkaline imbalance in the small or large intestines, lack of digestive enzymes. To learn more about the structure and function of the digestive system click here and scroll through the articles: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?cat=15

Blood testing, saliva testing, and muscle testing can also be used here to identify the underlying issue. Once the cause is identified there are a variety of nutritional support products such as enzymes, probiotics, acid/alkaline balancers, and digestive tract healers.
Third, there can be excessive emotional stress. Too much stress keeps our body in a sympathetic nervous system response which is a problem as digestion is optimized as a parasympathetic nervous system function.

This can be identified through saliva testing of hormones or muscle testing or simply an awareness of current stressors in one’s life. It can be helpful to learn stress reduction techniques such as breathing and meditation to help alleviate some stress and to break the constant sympathetic nervous system response.

The next question is what type of “guest” are we dealing with. Testing options include muscle testing, stool testing, saliva testing, and blood testing. I have found muscle testing to be most helpful and the most cost effective. I previously used stool and saliva testing more frequently, but find I get similar results from muscle testing, and verification from blood testing.

Stool and saliva testing can identify parasites, yeast, fungus, and bacterial infections, along with inflammatory markers in the small and large intestines, pancreatic enzyme activity levels, and blood in the stool. Blood testing can identify chronic and acute infections from bacteria, parasites, and viruses, and suggest hydrochloric acid levels in the stomach. Often, we are told that our blood tests are “normal.” It is critical to remember that “normal” does not mean “optimal” or “healthy”. When we look at the details of the total white blood cell count and the differential we can observe patterns that suggest chronic and/or acute infection patterns.

Once we know what we are dealing then we use the proper remedies. Each type of issue requires its own protocol. The remedies I use include herbs, homeopathics, and nutritional products that are antimicrobial. Depending on the “guest” there are anti-virals, anti-fungals, anti-yeast, anti-mold, anti-parasites, and anti-bacterial varieties. There are also enzymes, probiotics, and other gut healers to support the digestive tract. To determine the specific protocol for each person I use muscle testing. I have many different products in the office and I use the muscle testing to identify the specific supplement(s) for each individual.

I hope this article has helped you to better understand the process and see that there is definitely a solution to digestive distress. This is one of the most common issues that clients come to the office for and one that is always resolved if the client is compliant with the recommendations. It important to recognize that getting rid of the unwanted “guest” and healing the digestive tract is a process that generally takes at least 3-4 months and for some people up to a year.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

How Words Can Be Deceiving – What Monsanto Says about Glyphosate but What it Really Means

As I’ve been saying over the past few months – I love to learn! I just returned from the Physica Energetics annual conference called Concordia. Not only did I get to be in beautiful Santa Barbara (I’d never been there before), hang out with some interesting practitioners, learn new stuff to apply in my practice, and gain knowledge to share.

This is under “knowledge to share.” Thanks to Dr. Robert Cass for educating me! Below is information quoted from his presentation.

“According to Monsanto, producer of Roundup, the most popular herbicide used on the planet, the product is nearly nontoxic for humans. The usage of Roundup to kill weeds has skyrocketed around the world since the year 2000, in part it went off patent that year, but also because of the enormous increase (especially in the U.S.) in the appearance of “Roundup-Ready” GMO crops.”

Before I continue – doesn’t the phrase “nearly nontoxic” concern you? That still means it is toxic!!

Continuing, “Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, kills weeds by interfering with what is called the shikimate pathway. This pathway is essential in plants for the synthesis of a class of amino acids called the “aromatics.” But this pathway is nonexistent in any mammalian cell. By simple logic, the fact that our cells don’t have this pathway means that glyphosate cannot harm us.”

So far – so good? We don’t have this pathway, so it can’t harm us. Apparently a true statement. But here’s the rub…

Back to Dr. Cass, “While mammals don’t possess the shikimate pathway all of the microbes that take up residence in our digestive tract do have that pathway. If they are exposed to glyphosate gut bacteria is disrupted causing inflammation in the gut along with an overgrowth of pathogenic forms and concurrent loss of beneficial bacteria…There’s also an intricate connection between the gut and the brain, such that an unhealthy digestive system translates into pathologies in the brain.”

Here’s why the aromatic amino acids are so important. In this category are: tryptophan (the precursor to serotonin), tyrosine (the precursor to dopamine), and phenylalanine. These are essential nutrients – neurotransmitters.

Serotonin deficiency plays a role in autism, obesity, Alzheimer’s, depression, suicide, and homicidal behavior. Serotonin is a precursor for melatonin which regulates the wake-sleep cycle. Tyrosine deficiency is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Glyphosate activates an enzyme called phenylalanine lyase (PAL) which breaks down phenylalanine and releases ammonia as a by-product. Excess ammonia in the blood is associated with seizures.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

November 2014 Newsletter – Probiotics: Trick or Treat?

An early Happy Thanksgiving to everyone and the beginning of the Holiday Season. This is an especially important time to be mindful of what you are eating and drinking as with all the festivities it can easily get away from us!

Digestion is one of my favorite topics and that is the focus of this month’s newsletter. Many of my clients suffer from a variety of digestive issues – in fact it is the largest segment of my practice – from gas, bloating, and occasional heart burn; to constipation, diarrhea, and acid reflux; and then on to IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, Celiac, and diverticulitis.

In my late teens, through college, and into my mid-thirties I too suffered with digestive issues. I was diagnosed with IBS and the “solution” was to eat more fiber. That didn’t really work. As I began to learn more about healthy eating it turned out to be a relatively simple fix – stop eating bagels and cereals for breakfast – and soon my digestion was vastly improved and my seasonal asthma was gone!

One of the solutions for digestive ailments that we often hear is to take probiotics. And, there is an underlying assumption that the more we take, the better. But is this the whole story? Read below and see!

This past weekend I attended a special event for Standard Process’s top accounts from across the country. It was an honor to be there and to meet other like minded practitioners. Needless to say I came away with more ideas to share. One of the more interesting presentations was on a new product called NutriSync. It matches your genes with the nutrients you should be eating to maximize your genetic expression. I’m going to do it this month to get firsthand experience and plan to offer it in January – sounds like a great New Year’s Resolution.

Next month brings us to the heart of the Holiday Season and its parties, foods, and drinks. For many people this means additional stress! This challenges our nervous system. Next month’s feature article will look at the three key minerals to keeping your nervous system balanced.

Without further ado, here’s the heart of the newsletter!


Probiotics: Do You Need Them or Not?

To say we are only as good as our digestion may be an understatement. You can eat the healthiest of foods, but if you are not digesting them, you are not getting the nutrients that your body requires for long term health.

It is likely you are familiar with the three classes of foods that need to be digested – protein, carbohydrates, and fats. However, it is less likely you are familiar with the “triad of digestion” or the three essential substances produced in your body necessary for strong digestion – hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and bile. Hydrochloric acid and lactic acid are as their names indicate – acids, while bile is an alkaline substance.

To continue reading this article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=35

I’d also highly encourage you to read my past articles on digestion:

It’s All About The Gut and the Gut Balance Program click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=53

The Mouth – Why Chewing is Important click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=132

The Importance of Enzymes click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=129

The Stomach click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=127

The Importance of Hydrochloric Acid click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=124

The Small Intestines click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=123

The Liver, Gall Bladder, and Pancreas – Behind the Scenes Helpers of Digestion click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=121

The Large Intestines and the Importance of Probiotics click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=120

Digestion What to Do? A Self Help Guide click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=118

Nutrition Made Simple – A New Blog Series

I’m pleased to announce a new weekly Blog series I’m calling “Nutrition Made Simple.” My tendency is to write longer articles with detailed explanations. It has come to my attention that some clients also like “short and sweet.” So, I will start offer these short blogs that get right to the point – Nutrition Made Simple. My goal is one blog per week on Thursdays. Topics will include:

1. Why sugar is bad for you

2. Why artificial sweeteners are bad for you

3. Why trans-fats are bad for you

4. Why saturated fat is good for you

5. Why you need cholesterol

6. Why protein is important

7. Why you need the right kind of stomach acid

8. Why you want to hang on to your gall bladder

9. How prolonged stress impacts the body

10. What specific vitamins do and where to get them

Probiotics: Do We Need Them or Not?

Digestion is one of my favorite topics. Many of my clients suffer from a variety of digestive issues: from gas, bloating, and occasional heart burn; to constipation, diarrhea, and acid reflux; and then on to IBS, Crohn’s, colitis, Celiac, and diverticulitis. In my late teens, through college, and into my mid-thirties I too suffered with digestive issues. I was diagnosed with IBS and the “solution” was to eat more fiber. That didn’t really work. As I began to learn more about healthy eating it turned out to be a relatively simple fix – stop eating bagels and cereals for breakfast – and soon my digestion was vastly improved and my seasonal asthma was gone!

To say we are only as good as our digestion may be an understatement. You can eat the healthiest of foods, but if you are not digesting them, you are not getting the nutrients that your body requires for long term health.

It is likely you are familiar with the three classes of foods that need to be digested – protein, carbohydrates, and fats. However, it is less likely you are familiar with the “triad of digestion” or the three essential substances produced in your body necessary for strong digestion – hydrochloric acid, lactic acid, and bile. Hydrochloric acid and lactic acid are as their names indicate – acids, while bile is an alkaline substance.

Hydrochloric acid is produced in the stomach and primarily responsible for protein digestion. Bile is produced in the liver, concentrated and stored in the gall bladder, and released into the duodenum (small intestine) to enable fat digestion. Lactic acid is made in the colon (large intestine) and finishes up carbohydrate digestion.

The digestion process starts in the stomach as hydrochloric acid sterilizes and breaks food down into liquid. It kills potential pathogens such as bacteria and parasites; prepares calcium, zinc, and Vitamin B12 to be properly utilized; and begins the digestion of proteins. Digestive issues will start when the body does not make or does not have adequate levels of hydrochloric acid. For more information you can reference my articles The Importance of Hydrochloric Acid by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=124 and The Stomach by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=127. The supplements Betaine Hydrochloride and Zypan from Standard Process can increase acidity in the stomach when the body does not make sufficient hydrochloric acid.

While the environment in the stomach needs to be acidic, for the small intestines to do their job, the environment must be slightly alkaline. The gall bladder sends bile into the small intestines where it will help to alkalize the environment by neutralizing the hydrochloric acid coming in from the stomach and it will emulsify fats and oils so they can be properly digested. If the body is not providing sufficient bile there are obvious consequences. For more information you can reference my articles The Liver, Gall Bladder, and Pancreas – Behind the Scenes Helpers of Digestion by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=121 and The Small Intestines by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=123. There are a variety of supplements from Standard Process that support liver and gall bladder functionality including A-F Betafood, Betafood, and Cholacol.

The last stop on the digestion train is the colon. The natural state of the colon is acidic and lactic acid is the key. The “good” in “good bacteria” is their ability to convert carbohydrates into lactic acid. Lactic acid protects the body from pathogenic bacteria, yeast, and fungus and lines the colon, vaginal tract, and skin to protect against overgrowth. When our gut bacteria are mostly of the “bad” bacteria, this does not occur, resulting in gas and bloating, vaginal yeast infections, and skin problems. For more information you can reference my articles The Large Intestine and the Importance of Probiotics by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=120 and It’s All About the Gut by clicking here http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=53.

This is where the discussion of probiotics comes into play. As I state in the latter article, “Our microbiome is a large, diverse and dynamic population of micro-organisms. During birth and the first two years of life we acquire our “native bacteria.” This comes primarily from our mother from our birth and (hopefully) subsequent breast feeding. Thus, mom’s health and her microbiome are of extreme importance to baby and instrumental in shaping the future health of the child. After this “transient bacteria” is constantly ingested into our body from food, water, air, and if we choose probiotics.”

This means that any Probiotic you are taking is essentially “transient.” This means for it to be effective you need to keep taking it. It is not populating your gut. If you stop, it is likely that the “bad” bacteria, yeast, and fungus will then take over the environment. Perhaps there is another way to address the issue.

There are three main yeasts that we come across in our diet. Baker’s yeast converts carbohydrates into carbon dioxide (gas); Brewer’s yeast converts carbohydrates into alcohol (fermentation); and Mycelium yeast converts carbohydrates into lactic acid. Mycelium yeast is found in a supplement from Standard Process called Lactic Acid Yeast. By increasing our consumption of this type of yeast we can increase the lactic acid in our colon which helps prevent the growth of pathogenic bacteria, reduces the risk of colon cancer, and crowds out other yeast and fungus while protecting the lining of our colon.

Therefore, we can conclude, that taking a supplement such as Lactic Acid Yeast may actually be more beneficial as it will reduce the “bad” bacteria, yeast, and fungus while creating the natural environment for your own “good” native bacteria to rule the environment.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

It’s All About The Gut and the Gut Balance Program

Among the latest and greatest breakthroughs of modern medicine is the mapping of the human genome with its vast potential for gene based therapies. I find this work extremely interesting although I’m not exactly sure where it will lead. What’s even more interesting is the work being done to explore the genome of what is living in our gut that is not human. This is referred to as our microbiome. It is the trillions of bacteria and other microscopic living organisms that are an integral part of us. They are found on our skin, in our mouth, throughout the inside of our body, and most famously in our gut (our stomach, small intestines, and large intestines).

Our microbiome is a large, diverse and dynamic population of micro-organisms. During birth and the first two years of life we acquire our “native bacteria.” This comes primarily from our mother from our birth and (hopefully) subsequent breast feeding. Thus, mom’s health and her microbiome are of extreme importance to baby and instrumental in shaping the future health of the child. After this “transient bacteria” is constantly ingested into our body from food, water, air, and if we choose probiotics.

These organisms are counted in CFUs (colony-forming unit) of live organisms. In your gut they are specifically measured as CFU/g or colony-forming units per gram of solid material. Here’s where it gets interesting! While a CFU is not specifically a “cell” it is a close approximation. The stomach and the duodenum (first part of small intestines) have the smallest number of organisms around 103 (1,000) CFU/g. In the rest of the small intestines (the jejunum and ileum) the number increases from 104 to 107 (ten million) CFU/g. And by the time we get to the colon (large intestine) things are really cooking! There are now 1012 CFU/g. For you math majors that is one trillion – 1,000,000,000,000 – and that is per gram!

It is believed that the entire human body consists of 1014 cells of which only 1013 are of human origin, the remaining 90% are bacteria. That is why you will hear statements to the affect that we have more bacteria cells than human!

Across the human population it is estimated that there are 40,000 unique bacteria species. Every person has a unique profile of predominant and subdominant species. Scientists have even found that some bacteria strains are only found in one person!

So, what does this all mean? Human genome research has identified approximately 20,000 unique human genes. Your gut microbiome has up to 3.3 million unique genes, 150 times more than its human host. This means that the gut microbiome may perform functions not encoded in the human genome. In English – it means that your personal bacteria have significant influence on your health. Current research suggests that tendencies for obesity, diabetes, and heart disease may be more related to your gut genes than your own human genes! Are we inheriting “bad” genes or is it actually “bad” guts?

What do they do? Why has this evolved as part of the human? The “good” bacteria have beneficial effects so we’ve allowed them to settle in. They ferment the non-digestible carbohydrates that we consume (for example certain types of fiber) which they feed on to survive and also produce short chain fatty acids (SCFA). SCFAs support our immune system (by being anti-microbial – killing bad bacteria and yeast) and fire our metabolism which aids in weight loss or the maintenance of a healthy body weight. The beneficial bacteria aid in our absorption of calcium, magnesium, and iron; manufacture Vitamins B5, B7, B9, B12, and K; synthesize amino acids; and keep the pH of the colon properly acidic. At the same time they provide a barrier lining the gut to keep out potential pathogens.

What about when things aren’t quite right? Dysbiosis is used to describe when bad bacteria take control of an area. This can occur in the mouth (bad breath, periodontitis and gum disease); in the stomach (the bacteria Helicobacter pylori had been linked to ulcers); and in the small and large intestines. Common causes of dysbiosis include: sub-optimal mother’s gut microbiota, birth, and neonatal nutrition; antibiotics; stress; an unhealthy diet such as the Standard American Diet heavy on processed and refined foods and sugar, while low in vegetables; a decreased immune status (low secretory IgA); decreased gut motility; low hydrochloric acid production; altered intestinal pH (generally the colon is not acidic enough to create a hostile environment for bad bacteria and yeast/fungus); and an intestinal infection or infestation.

Many challenges have been linked to dysbiosis including autoimmune diseases, other digestive problems, and other general health issues.

Autoimmune diseases linked to dysbiosis include: Crohn’s disease; ulcerative colitis; rheumatoid arthritis; Ankylosing Spondylitis; Graves’ disease; chronic active hepatitis; and Type 1 diabetes.

Other digestive problems linked to dysbiosis include: irritable bowel syndrome (IBS); bad gas; food sensitivities; chronic diarrhea and constipation; general poor digestion; diverticulitis; and gastrointestinal infections and intestinal overgrowth.

Other general poor health issues linked to dysbiosis include: lack of well-being, low energy, and fatigue; poor immunity, allergies, and chronic skin disorders; breast and colon cancer; metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and obesity; Type 2 diabetes; depression and anxiety; chronic pain syndromes; and possibly autism.

The gut balance program includes supplements to support the elimination of bad bacteria and the healthy re-population of your gut with beneficial bacteria. It has an herbal formula that is antimicrobial (attacks bacteria, fungi and protozoa that should not be there), cleanses the intestines, and stimulates digestion. It includes a prebiotic to feed the good bacteria and support their population growth. Prebiotics are food ingredients that humans cannot digest which provide health benefits to the good bacteria in our gut. These include: non-digestible carbohydrates, glucans, galactans, resistant starch, pectins, hemicellulose, arabinoxylans, inulin-type fructans, and galacto-oligosaccharides. And, it includes a probiotic. Quite the complete package!

The program is designed in the short term to promote a healthy and balanced intestinal flora, cleanse the lower gastrointestinal tract, and maintain a healthy GI environment. In the long term this supports healthy digestion, improves nutrient absorption, and supports a healthy immune system.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Digestion: What to Do (A Self Help Guide)

Here are some recommendations to reduce symptoms of acid reflux. Drinking eight ounces of water about 30 minutes prior to a meal supplies fluid to form sufficient amounts of gastric juices. Once you begin the meal drink no more than a cup of additional fluid. If you can, it is best not to drink at all. By drinking liquids, even water, you are reducing the acidity of the stomach, so it needs to work harder. My grandmother never drank with her meals and now I understand why!

Another home remedy is to drink organic raw apple cider vinegar prior to eating. The vinegar does not actually digest anything; it just aids the stomach in becoming acidic so that pepsin will be released.

To further heal the body it is recommended to wean off acid stopping medications (with doctor’s permission and assistance). Begin to eat healthy foods and in smaller meals. Do not lie down within four hours of a meal. Lying on your left side can help relieve heartburn and aid digestion. It keeps the stomach below the esophagus.

How do you know if you are making sufficient HCl or pancreatic enzymes? You can perform a self check using a couple of easily accessible reflex points.

The HCl reflex point: To check for low stomach acid or hypochloridria follow this procedure. Lie on your back with your knees bent. Begin with the second and third fingers of your right hand at your Xiphoid process (the point at the bottom of your rib cage). Move your fingers down approximately 1” below the Xiphoid process and then move the fingers to the left edge of the rib cage. Come in at about a 45° angle with the finger tips. The point is on the edge of the rib cage. You will want to poke around an area about the size of a quarter as the placement of the point can vary somewhat. If the point is tender this indicates a need for HCl until the tenderness goes away. Sometimes people are confused whether it is really tender or just the poking. The best was to tell is to poke your rib cage nearby with the same pressure. You should be able to determine the difference between a poke and a tender spot.

The Enzyme reflex point: To check the pancreatic enzyme output follow the procedure above except use the left hand and slide the two fingers to the edge of the rib cage on your right side. The Enzyme point is directly across from the HCl point.

Pancreas Point: There are two other ways to check the pancreas. The first involves applying slight pressure to see if it is tender. The pancreas is deep in the abdomen. To find it place your hands just below the left side of the bottom of the rib cage. If you press in at 45° angle with both hands you will be on the head of the pancreas. Note whether or not it is tender. The second way to check the pancreas is from a reflex point on your right thumb pad muscle. Find this location and squeeze and palpate. Again, if there is tenderness, there is stress in the pancreas.

Gall bladder – acute: This test is called Murphy’s Sign and is for acute gall bladder problems. There are two parts to the test. First take a deep breath in and out and put your fingers under the right rib cage. Next, take another breath in. This pushes the gall bladder and liver against the fingers. Notice if there is tenderness. This can be done at both the upper and lower quadrants of the liver.

Gall bladder – chronic: This point is found on the right hand. Where the thumb and forefinger come together (fleshy point, not muscle) use a pinching, rolling motion to look for tenderness and nodulation. Use the index finger for support with the thumb on top. Then, pinch and roll. The tenderness will go away before the nodulation. The nodule is a physical response. Sometimes pain is subjective and pain goes away first. The nodule goes away slower over time.

You can also do a self test for yeast. First thing in the morning pour a glass of water and spit into it before put anything in your mouth. Check the water every 15 minutes. If you see things floating down, the spit grows legs or it gets cloudy, the saliva is carrying fungal overgrowth. If saliva is still floating after one hour, you are likely okay.

A few other notes of interest:

Lower bowel gas is never good. It is a sign something is not digesting. In general, an earthy smell comes from the large intestines, while foul smells come from liver or gall bladder issues.

If you have burning sensations in your stomach that eating relieves there is the potential for an ulcer that should be checked.

In order to eat meat you must have HCl. Often, when people lose the taste for meat that is the body being smart since they are unable to adequately digest it and their body encourages them to avoid it.

If you suffer discomfort after eating here are some reference points. If it hurts at the bottom of breast bone this may be the esophagus. Pain in the left rib cage is associated with the stomach. If the left shoulder hurts after eating you likely ate too much. Your stomach is so full that it is pressing against your diaphragm. This refers to the left shoulder. If your right shoulder blade hurts it is likely your liver or gall bladder is inflamed. When the pain is in between the shoulder blades it is the stomach.

If you feel it all through the abdomen both front and back check the pancreas. If the pain is above the belly button it is originating from the stomach. If it is around the bell button it is from the small intestines. And, if below the belly button it is coming from the large intestines.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He has offices in Thiensville and Glendale, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

The Large Intestines and the Importance of Probiotics

The last internal stop of our process is the large intestine or colon. The small intestines pass the remaining undigested material to the large intestine. Here it is stored and concentrated by absorbing water. The majority of our micro flora are also here – both beneficial and detrimental. Micro flora is also found in the small intestines and stomach.

Once again the internal environment changes as the colon is slightly acidic at 6.8. The large intestine is where sodium, potassium, other vitamins and minerals, and water are absorbed. Of that original seven liters of enzymes the remaining 1.5 liters is absorbed in the colon. Feces made here which are one third matter and two thirds water. A major part of the feces is dead bacteria. There are several pounds of flora in the bowel. The beneficial flora produce B Vitamins, Vitamin K, and will digest proteins.

We have 400 to 500 types of bacteria in our digestive system. This is often simplified as the “good” and the “bad” bacteria. To keep it simple the “good” bacteria are those that live on some of the undigested material and their waste products are vitamins that we can use. The “good” bacteria are called probiotics. The most prominent are: Lactobacilli (Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus bulgaricus), Bifidobacterium, and Saccharomyces boulardi.

On the other hand the “bad” bacteria are those who live on other undigested material, mostly the sugar and other carbohydrates, and produce waste that is toxic to our system causing bloating, gas, and many of the other digestive disorders that we previously spoke of.

When we discuss our micro flora or bacteria think of it as continuous war with many battles. All the varieties are battling to survive. When you take an antibiotic (anti-life) it kills all the bacteria – both the good and the bad, but not yeast such as candida which takes over. This is why often have yeast infection after round of antibiotics.

There are a variety of food sources for the good bacteria. These include the cultured or fermented foods such as: yogurt, kefir, raw sauerkraut, kimchi, miso, tamari, and tempeh. Another source is probiotic supplements.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He has offices in Thiensville and Glendale, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

The Liver, Gall Bladder, and Pancreas – Behind the Scenes Helpers of Digestion

When we think of digestion we usually think of the stomach, small intestines, and large intestines – often collectively referred to as “the gut.” Playing a key role behind the scenes are the liver, gall bladder, and pancreas.

The liver is one of the most critical organs in the body. Once the liver shuts down the body is pretty much finished. Among its hundreds or perhaps thousands of jobs are: cleaning/purifying the blood and removing toxins, fat metabolism, building proteins/amino acid synthesis, and for purposes of digestion – manufacturing bile. After being made in the liver bile is stored and concentrated in the gall bladder.

The acidic food passing from the stomach to the small intestine stimulates the pancreas and gall bladder. Foods high in fat have to be emulsified. This is what bile does. It is a “degreaser”. If the oil is not degreased, the enzymes cannot get to the food.

The body makes 1-6 cups of bile per day. Bile has pH of 7.8 which is slightly alkaline. Gall bladder contractions send bile into the small intestines. Bile that stays in the gall bladder gets reconstituted and thickens and can eventually form stones. This thickening is referred to as biliary stasis which prevents the bile from flowing to the small intestines. One of the problems in eating a low fat diet is by consuming less fat there is less need for bile. This increases the likelihood of biliary stasis.

Bile influences the color of stools. Light colored stools indicate liver and gall bladder need help. Stools should be brown. Any other color is suspect.

The pancreas secretes hormones (insulin and glucagon) and enzymes thus it is often overworked. We have previously discussed the key role that pancreatic enzymes play in the small intestines. We will later discuss the importance of insulin and glucagon.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He has offices in Thiensville and Glendale, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.