Category Archives: Weight Loss

January 2016 Newsletter – Happy New Year!!

Happy New Year!! Wow – 2016!

Through the magic of the Internet I can send out this newsletter while still out of the country! I will be back in the office on Friday January 8 just for product pickup with appointments resuming on Monday January 11.

This is the time of New Year’s Resolutions – to eat better and to exercise regularly. So, I’m here to help and make it simple. This month’s newsletter looks at some gems from the past – the best foods to eat and the best way to exercise and the best book on nutrition!

The Best Book on Nutrition

She’s been telling us to eat fat for over 20 years. Always ahead of her times, Ann Louise Gittleman has revised and updated her book Eat Fat, Lose Weight. This was the first book of its kind when it came out. I encourage you to read it. For a nice overview of the book, click here: http://annlouise.com/2015/11/20/debunking-those-big-fat-lies/

What to Eat – 20 Foods You Should Have in Your Diet
I have run these articles several times in the past, but the truth is, that there’s nothing really new in what is healthy to eat! While the articles each highlight ten foods as you read them you’ll see there are actually quite a few more listed that relate to the one identified.

The first ten foods are: Blueberries, Apples, Kale, Almonds, Quinoa, Wild Salmon, Avocado, Kefir, Coconut Oil, and Butter. To read why click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=78

The second ten foods are: Broccoli, Garlic, Sweet Potatoes, Eggs, Whey Protein, Water, Cranberry Juice, Olive Oil, Grass Fed Beef, and Brown Rice. To read why click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=77

The Most Efficient Exercise
In the past I’ve written a few articles about exercise. I’ve told you about PACE and PACE Express from Dr. Sears, BurstFit by Dr. Axe, and the Xiser stepper to name a few. All of these techniques are similar in they promote what is called “burst training” or “sprint training” and now “HIT” (high intensity training). All work off a similar premise – the human body was not designed to run a marathon and the average person does not have to spend hours upon hours exercising to get in shape.

In fact, they even boldly state that being fit is not necessarily the same as being healthy and that many people over-exercise which has negative impacts on their health. This has been my experience with many of my clients. They come to me and say, “I don’t get it. I work out every day with my trainer and I keep gaining weight.”

Body by Science explains all the whys behind this. It provides the research and the science behind how exercise impacts the body. I wrote a series of four articles which are listed below.

1. Introduction to Body by Science
2. The Cardio Myth
3. Fat Metabolism
4. Genetic Expression

So, without further ado, let’s get to Body by Science.

Getting Started With Body by Science

“I don’t understand. I work out every day and I’m still gaining weight.” Believe it or not I hear this question quite frequently. On the surface it seems to be quite the paradox. All the conventional wisdom tells us to lose weight all we need to do is watch what we eat (meaning to eat less) and exercise more. Follow this simple formula: use more calories than you take in.

In the past I’ve explained part of this myth – how all calories are not created equal. Based on what the calorie is from (protein, fat, or carbohydrate) it will have a different effect in your body. If you need a refresher you can find that article on my blog at http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=135.

Now let’s explore the other half of the equation: exercise more. This of course leads to a series of questions. What type of exercise is best? How many times a week should I exercise? How long should I exercise?

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=27

The Cardio Myth
This article addresses the cardio myth. The recommended method of exercise is what he terms high intensity training (or HIT). It benefits both the aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways. Most “cardio” only works the aerobic pathway.

High intensity training is in many ways the complete opposite of what is now known as “cardio.” HIT is designed to be short and sweet. The techniques work the major muscle groups to exhaustion and then you must stop, rest, and then begin the next exercise. Cardio is designed to be lower intensity so that you can perform the exercise without stopping, usually anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=26

Exercise and Hormones: Fat Burning (Yes) and Fat Storing (oh no!)

This article offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”
The effectiveness of exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism and blood glucose levels. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=21

It’s In Your Genes: Ten Factors That Influence Exercise Outcomes
One of my favorite parts in Body by Science is the discussion of genetic expression. It plays a major role in our physical appearance. People can do similar types of exercise but in the end their genes determine how their physical activity is expressed in their body.
Quite simply there are certain things that are meant to be and they aren’t going to change. They show a picture of a forest of the same type of tree, yet one is significantly taller than the others. If you only saw it, you’d assume it was the norm, but in fact it is the exception.

These same basic principles apply to the human body. Some people are the way they are simply because of genetics. Two people could do the exact same workout but based on their genes one can emerge as a championship body builder and the other will not.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=17
Here’s a link to the web site: http://www.bodybyscience.net/home.html/. There are videos, blogs, and other helpful information. I highly recommend it.

The Road to Better Health Starts with Food!

With the New Year upon us many of us make the resolution to be healthier. In most cases that is interpreted as losing weight. Many of us will join the gym and begin to exercise. For some that will be sufficient as the last few holiday pounds come off. However, to ensure better health in the long term that is not the solution. The road to better health starts with food and drink – what we are putting into our body.

My purpose in this article is to be straight forward and make it simple. Here are the foods I recommend you eat on a regular basis, unless of course you are allergic. These foods emphasize what lacks in many American diets – vegetables and fruit for vitamins and minerals to fuel our metabolism, healthy sources of protein to build our bodies, and healthy fats that are sources of Omega 3’s and vitamins A, D, E, and K. If you want more details about these foods see my blog and other nutrition resources.

Before we explore what to eat, it is equally and perhaps more important to avoid certain foods. These foods are the main cause of poor health and disease. They are: excess sugar (that means anything that isn’t naturally in the food), high fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners, highly processed vegetable oils, and trans-fats.

Now, on to the good stuff! Here’s what to eat and you’ll notice there is plenty of choice! Eating healthy is easy and fun. But it does require a little effort as well.

First and foremost is water! While we don’t necessarily think of water as food, it is one of the most important nutrients for your body. Most of us simply do not drink enough water. And remember – coffee is not water, juice is not water, milk is not water, beer is not water – water is water! What kind should you drink? Due to space constraints I’ll keep it simple – some type of filtered water without chlorine and fluoride is best. How much to drink? The rule of thumb is one half your body weight in ounces. That is not universal so you need to see what works for you. If you introduce more vegetables into your diet they are loaded with water.

Eat more vegetables. The best are the leafy greens and the cruciferous family. To ease digestion both leafy greens and cruciferous vegetables are best steamed or lightly stir fried. They should both be staples in your diet. Leafy greens include kale, Swiss chard, beet greens, mustard greens, collard greens, and spinach. The cruciferous family includes broccoli, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, bok choy, and Swiss chard.

Eat more fruit, but don’t overdo it. Vegetables are way more important than fruit and fruit should be limited to 25 grams of fructose per day. The best fruits are berries because they are low in fructose. Include blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, and cherries in your diet. Berries freeze well so you can stock up while they are fresh during the summer and use them year round.

Eat healthy sources of protein. This means grass fed meats, pastured chickens, wild fish, and eggs from pastured chickens. Except for the fish, these are all available from local farmers.

I encourage you to avoid high carbohydrate foods such as cereals, grains, and rice. But, if you must have something then Quinoa (keen-wah) is your best bet. It is gluten free and is loaded with minerals and fiber.

Eat healthy sources of fat. This includes avocado, organic butter, extra virgin olive oil, organic coconut oil, and nuts and seeds. For those with an allergy to the dairy protein casein, ghee (clarified butter) is an equally healthy option.

Nuts and seeds are a good source of fat, protein, and fiber. They are best digested and utilized by the body when raw and then soaked and dehydrated. Consider almonds, walnuts, pecans, macadamia, pumpkin seeds, and sunflower seeds. They make an excellent snack (please, just a handful).

Find a fermented food that you like. This can be raw sauerkraut, Kim-chi, or kefir. Kefir is a lacto-fermented dairy product. Your best bet is to buy plain versions and add your own fruit. If you have a dairy allergy you can use coconut milk or coconut water kefir.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Now’s the Time to Take Advantage of Fresh Vegetables and Their Nutritional Benefits – Part 1

I don’t know about you, but this is my favorite time of the year. Not only is the weather beautiful and the days long, but it means our fresh local vegetables are here! They are at the road side stands, the Farmer’s Markets, and the CSAs begin delivering. For those of you unfamiliar with the term CSA it means Consumer Supported Agriculture. You (the consumer) buy direct from local farmers who offer these programs. There are many CSAs in our area with deliveries likely into your neighborhood and I encourage you to find one. It is not only good for you, but supports your local farmer as well. The CSA I belong to had its first delivery of the year including basil, lettuce, spinach, arugula, green onions, pole beans, and even some maple syrup!

Among the few concepts that virtually everyone providing nutritional advice will tell you is “eat more vegetables!” Why? Vegetables are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and fiber. The most nutritious vegetables are the dark leafy greens (kale, spinach, collard greens, mustard greens, chard) and the Cruciferous family (broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, cabbage). These are loaded with Beta-Carotene, Vitamin C, Folate, Vitamin E, Vitamin K, Calcium, Magnesium, Potassium, and Zinc.

In this article I’ll provide a brief summary of these vitamins and how they support the body. Part 2 will summarize the minerals.

Beta-carotene is found in plant food, such as carrots, red bell peppers, sweet potatoes, winter squash, and leafy greens (collard greens, kale, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip greens). Beta-carotene is the plant form of Vitamin A which our body will convert. Vitamin A supports the endocrine, immune, integumentary (that’s skin), and reproductive systems along with our eyes. It is required for growth and natural repair of many body tissues, and maintains integrity of blood cells and epithelial tissue lining the gut, lungs, and reproductive tract.

Vitamin C is found in broccoli, Brussels sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, and red bell peppers. And of course during the summer we can get plenty of blueberries, strawberries, and cantaloupe melon – also a great source of Vitamin C. Vitamin C supports all our cells and tissues and in doing so aids the blood, cardiovascular, endocrine, immune, musculoskeletal, and nervous systems. It helps to form collagen which is in our connective tissue – it keeps us together! It also facilitates iron absorption and assists in cholesterol metabolism.

Folate is found in leafy greens (collard greens, spinach), legumes (black beans, garbanzo beans, kidney beans, lentils, navy beans, pinto beans), and asparagus. Folate is the natural form of folic acid used by your body to facilitate life! It is critical to the metabolism of nucleic acids and amino acids. This metabolism is what makes everything happen in your body which is why I say it facilitates life. Folate is at the heart of methylation – perhaps the most critical function of the body. It is beyond the scope of this article but I encourage you to consult Dr. Google to learn more. In short, folate supports overall growth and development and blood cell formation and supports normal growth of the fetus.

Vitamin E is found in leafy greens (collard greens, mustard greens, spinach, Swiss chard, and turnip greens), and olives. We can also get Vitamin E from almonds and sunflower seeds. Vitamin E supports a healthy immune system and proper nerve and muscle function. It is also important to the heart and supports circulation through healthy blood clotting. It keeps the skin and hair shiny and healthy.

Vitamin K is found primarily in broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, and cabbage. There are two forms of Vitamin K – K1 and K2 – one from plant and one from animal – and yes we need both! While it is best known for clotting, it is also involved in bone mineralization, a critical part of making bone and promotes healthy liver function.

Please note that these vitamins are found in other food sources as well. For the purposes of this article I wanted to illustrate their availability in all the wonderful fresh vegetables (and a few fruits) that are being grown locally and are now or will soon be available to you. Enjoy!

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

April 2015 Newsletter: No April Fool’s Here: Serious Stuff for Your Health

I hope you are enjoying the series of articles based on the book Body by Science. This month’s newsletter features the third installment discussing the all important area of the hormonal impact of exercise. Unfortunately this is one of the most misunderstood aspects of exercise. While exercise has many benefits, improper exercise can create hormone imbalances. Hormones determine and drive most of our body’s functions, thus hormone imbalances can be at the root of many disturbing symptoms. For a refresher on hormones click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?cat=11

One of the best newsletters I receive is from Dr. Bruce West. Each month is packed with valuable information. His February issue was one of the best ever and I wanted to share a few of his nutritional nuggets from that issue. This article follows below.


New stuff in the office: Supplements for pets and water tests.

Did you know that almost 70% of pets in U.S. households are on medications? I was shocked, but I guess not surprised when I read that in an article about Pfizer’s pet drug division. Many of my clients have pets at home and they are just concerned about their pet’s health as their own. Standard Process has an excellent line of pet products, particularly for cats, dogs, and horses. I have several clients who are aware of this and I am able to supply them with product. If you are interested let me know.

Ever wonder if your water supply is safe. I’ve come across some easy do it yourself home water tests from Silver Lake Research. I have in stock the well water test kit ($25) and the city water test kit ($20). For more information on the test kits you can click here: https://www.discovertesting.com/products/display_products_overviews.sd?iid=1&headtitle=Drinking%20Water%20Test%20Kits
If you are interested give me a call or send an email.


Exercise and Hormones: Fat Burning (Yes) and Fat Storing (oh no!)

I have recently introduced you to the book Body by Science by Doug McDuff, MD and John Little. This book offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. The effectiveness of exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism and blood glucose levels. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=21


Nutritional Nuggets from Dr. Bruce West

One of my favorite nutrition publications I get is Health Alert by Dr. Bruce West. Each month I look forward to the latest edition. The official title is Health Alert: When All Other Treatments Fail. I think you get the picture. Dr. West is a Chiropractor and a big fan of Standard Process products. He is also a big fan of the truth. February’s issue was full of juicy nuggets that I’d like to share.

Nugget #1: Almost all treatment for heart disease is unnecessary!

Nugget #2: Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes!

Nugget #3: Heart attacks are not caused by clogged arteries!

Nugget #4: Multiple sclerosis is directly linked to poor gut flora!

To read the complete post click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=19

Exercise and Hormones: Fat Burning (Yes) and Fat Storing (oh no!)

I have recently introduced you to the book Body by Science by Doug McDuff, MD and John Little. This book offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. The effectiveness of exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism and blood glucose levels. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle.

First, here’s a little background on fat. Fat is not the evil it is made out to be – either the fat we eat or the fat on our body. Fat (and the ability to store fat) is why humans have survived the many droughts, famines, and lean times in our history. Fat is how we store energy for future use. As I like to say, there were no refrigerators in the Garden of Eden. Having food available 24/7 is somewhat new in human history. Our ancestors ate when food was available and stored the excess as fat, allowing us to survive.

There’s also a popular myth that our hunter-gatherer ancestors were way more active than we are today, but there is little evidence of that. In fact it is not very likely. Since they didn’t have food all the time they would need to conserve their energy to find food and survive! Modern obesity is not from lack of exercise, but from too much food (and poor quality food at that – although that’s another series of articles!). For most of human history fat storage was essential to survive. Unfortunately today it now leads to obesity and chronic disease.

As mentioned earlier the key to exercise is how it impacts hormones. To understand this we need to look at how our body accesses and stores energy. The following explanation is simplified for the purposes of this discussion. It starts with our body breaking down food into useable components. One of these is glucose which goes into the blood stream. From there, glucose enters cells and is used to produce energy. Excess glucose, beyond what the cells are calling for, needs to be stored. The first storage sites are the muscles and liver where it is stored as glycogen. After that it is stored in fat cells.

The main benefit of high intensity training is the depletion of glycogen stores from the muscles. When glycogen is moving out of storage the hormone called hormone sensitive lipase is released. This allows body fat to be mobilized and burned for energy. Eventually the glycogen levels will be restored in the muscles coming from this mobilized fat.

In traditional cardio the glycogen is not released to the same extent. The muscles retain some glycogen, glucose remains in the blood stream and insulin is required to move the glucose out of the blood stream. Since the body does not sense a need to build glycogen stores the glucose is stored as fat. This may also have the effect of keeping insulin elevated which ultimately can lead to insulin resistance. Also when insulin is high, hormone sensitive lipase is inhibited.

Another hormone that gets into the act is called leptin. Leptin is our satiety hormone – it tells us we are full. The more fat we have, the more leptin is produced so that our appetitive will decrease and our body fat level will stabilize. A modern day problem has become leptin resistance. Similar to insulin resistance our body is not able to respond to all the excess leptin being produced so we are not properly getting the signal that we are full and should stop eating.

The bottom line is that HIT will lower insulin, leptin, and cortisol levels while increasing growth hormone while traditional cardio or “aerobics” will have the opposite hormonal effect.

A few other points of interest:

One of the big truth stretchers of the fitness industry is the measuring of “calories burned” on machines. We have what is called our basal metabolic rate. Just by living we burn calories. The BMR is how many calories you burn just by being alive at that moment. The calories burned being recorded by the machines are inclusive of those calories. The “calories burned” is highly misleading as if you stood on the machine and did nothing you’d still be burning calories!

Another basic truth is that no exercise per se burns a lot of body fat. As explained earlier, we survived by being very efficient with our fat. It is what kept us alive. So, if we were burning lots of fat by hunting and gathering or any other activity, it would jeopardize our ultimate survival.

In conclusion, our body developed ways to survive food scarcity so we could endure as a species. It was not designed for food abundance. Our modern diet which is high in carbohydrates keeps our blood glucose levels elevated, which keeps our insulin levels high, which keeps our glycogen stores high, so we are not able to burn fat.

And one last key factor is hydration. Most people do not drink enough water. Being properly hydrated improves our liver function which will support fat metabolism and improves cell structure so hormone receptors work properly. And, drought precedes famine. If we are not properly hydrated we are sending an evolutionary signal to our body to hold on to fat as it prepares for the upcoming famine.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes!

One of my favorite nutrition publications I get is Health Alert by Dr. Bruce West. Each month I look forward to the latest edition. The official title is Health Alert: When All Other Treatments Fail. I think you get the picture. Dr. West is a Chiropractor and a big fan of Standard Process products. He is also a big fan of the truth. February’s issue was full of juicy nuggets that I’d like to share.

Nugget #2: Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes! A study of mice showed that consuming artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, sucralose (Splenda), and aspartame (Equal, Sweet n low) cause glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes. In the study one group of mice was fed the artificial sweeteners and another group fed sugar. The ones fed sugar did not develop diabetes, just the artificial sweetener group. This was replicated in a small group of healthy human subjects who were placed on a diet containing artificial sweeteners. Within just one week over 50% of the humans developed glucose intolerance!

How does this happen? The artificial sweeteners alter our gut flora in the large intestines which changes our metabolism to favor glucose intolerance. This was proven by transplanting feces from the two groups of mice into germ-free mice. The mice that got the feces from the artificial sweetener fed mice developed diabetes. Not so with the mice getting feces from the sugar fed mice. This proves the artificial sweeteners affected the gut flora and led to glucose intolerance!

The Cardio Myth

I have recently introduced you to the book Body by Science by Doug McDuff, MD and John Little. This book offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. His recommended method of exercise is what he terms high intensity training (or HIT). It benefits both the aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways. Most “cardio” only works the aerobic pathway.

High intensity training is in many ways the complete opposite of what is now known as “cardio.” HIT is designed to be short and sweet. The techniques work the major muscle groups to exhaustion and then you must stop, rest, and then begin the next exercise. Cardio is designed to be lower intensity so that you can perform the exercise without stopping, usually anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour.

The roots of modern cardio trace back to the mid-1960’s when Kenneth Cooper was searching for an exercise that he thought would optimize cardiovascular fitness. This was the time when we first began to see a dramatic increase in heart disease related deaths and the thinking was by exercising our hearts they would not attack us!

Unfortunately he began with a false premise. He believed that “aerobic” was the same as “cardiovascular” and wanted to develop an exercise that would isolate the aerobic metabolic system. He created the term “aerobics” to refer to his exercise technique. This low intensity and steady in state method he developed is now referred to as “cardio.”

But this is where we have to understand how the body works! The body has two pathways for metabolism – aerobic and anaerobic. These processes are conducted in each and every cell in our body. Both are essential for the total health of the cell and thus the entire organism. Aerobic means “with oxygen” and anaerobic means “without oxygen.”

Cooper believed that the aerobic was the most important pathway therefore it should be isolated and trained. There was no actual evidence that one pathway was more important, it was just his belief, and unfortunately for many he was wrong. For many it proved to be dead wrong.

His main error was that the pathways cannot be separated in a live human (remember our body is not a test tube – what happens in the body is different than isolating something in a test tube!). The aerobic pathway is fueled by a substance called pyruvate which is produced by the anaerobic pathway.

As we’ve discussed before energy comes from glucose going from the blood stream into the cell. It takes a series of twenty chemical reactions to produce pyruvate from glucose. This is an anaerobic process. Pyruvate then goes to the mitochondria of the cell. If you remember your basic biology the mitochondria produces energy via the Krebs cycle in an aerobic process.

So, as you can see, we need an exercise method that will strengthen both systems of metabolism. Modern day “cardio” does not fit the bill as it isolates the aerobic and the science share in the book shows it does not benefit the anaerobic. It is high intensity training that will benefit the complete system.

The effectiveness of any exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism, and blood glucose levels. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle. This is explored further in the article Hormonal Implications of Exercise.

Another irony concerning aerobic specific training is that it produces additional oxidative stress on the body which creates inflammation and excess free radicals in the body. This factor puts one at increased risk of heart disease – exactly what the “cardio” exercise is supposed to help prevent!

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Why and How You Can Work Out Every Day and Gain Weight

“I don’t understand. I work out every day and I’m still gaining weight.” Believe it or not I hear this question quite frequently. On the surface it seems to be quite the paradox. All the conventional wisdom tells us to lose weight all we need to do is watch what we eat (meaning to eat less) and exercise more. Follow this simple formula: use more calories than you take in.

In the past I’ve explained part of this myth – how all calories are not created equal. Based on what the calorie is from (protein, fat, or carbohydrate) it will have a different effect in your body. If you need a refresher you can find that article on my blog at http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=135.

Now let’s explore the other half of the equation: exercise more. This of course leads to a series of questions. What type of exercise is best? How many times a week should I exercise? How long should I exercise?

Some people say “aerobic” is best. Some say weight lifting. Others say yoga, or interval training, and still others say high intensity training. Some tell you to do a different type of exercise every day for an hour. On the other spectrum some will tell you once to twice a week for fifteen to twenty minutes is all you need. You can see there is quite a variance in the answers.

To best understand any issue relating to health and nutrition I always ask one simple question. How is the body designed? When I discuss with clients what they should eat and what they should avoid I just don’t say “eat this and not that.” I explain to them how their body works and what the different foods will actually do in their body. When we understand how our body is designed to work it makes it much easier to determine what it needs and to separate myth from fact. Unfortunately in the world of health and nutrition there is a lot of myth and hype which is quite different than the facts.

Of course I am limited by the space of this article. Whole books have been written to address these questions and I’ve read quite a few of them! Recently I read one that I believe explains it the best – Body by Science by Doug McGuff, M.D. and John Little. With his medical background, Dr. McGuff understands how the body is designed and he uses this to explain the science of exercise.

My plan is to have several articles based on the book. I will use the remainder of this article to summarize the major points of the book. Future articles as noted below will be more in depth on specific topics. But in the mean time, if you are interested I’d encourage you to read the book sooner rather than later. It will likely change the way you think about exercise! Here is a quick summary of his major points:

1. Who can you trust? Most exercise testimonials and a fair amount of “research” is shall we say – slightly misleading and biased and does not address the true science of exercise.

2. Genetic expression plays a major role in our physical appearance. People can do similar types of exercise but in the end their genes determine how their physical activity is expressed in their body. I will have a separate article on this subject.

3. Being “fit” does not mean you are healthy.

4. High intensity training is his preferred method. It benefits both the aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways. Most “cardio” only works the aerobic pathway. The effectiveness of the exercise is all about hormones and blood glucose levels. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle. I will have a future article about the “cardio myth.”

5. Fat metabolism and fat loss is also determined by hormone activity which is affected by the type of exercise. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. Some exercise will produce the “burn” signal, others the “store” signal. I will have a future article about fat metabolism.

6. Exercising once to twice per week for 15 to 20 minutes when done according to his methodology is all you need to properly engage your body and manage the body building and fat burning hormones.

As you know from past articles I am also a big believer in “walking the talk.” I have found a local trainer who follows the basic principles as outlined in the book and began training several weeks ago. In one month I have already noticed several significant changes. I will keep you posted on that as well.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

January 2015 Newsletter – Start the Year with a Cleanse Plus: Purify the Body, Mind, and Soul and begin a Smart Exercise Program

Wow! That’s a long title for the newsletter, but it reflects all the new and important information I have to share with you. Remember last summer when I had lots of new stuff – well here we go again! Round Two! There is so much to share, so as I did last summer I’ll preview it here and provide the details over the next few months.

Before we get to the new stuff it is important to remember the basics. The best way to start off the New Year is to get back on track from the Holidays. Drop those few extra pounds and cleanse the body with the 21 Day Purification Program. I’ll be starting it myself next Tuesday (one last holiday dinner on Monday night!). See below for the details of the special offer.

Not sure if you need to the cleanse or not? Well, take this quick questionnaire to see: http://brwellness.com/docs/toxicity_questionnaire.pdf

Above, I also mentioned purifying the mind and soul, and starting a smart exercise program. I had some time at the end of the year to catch up on my reading. Two books had significant impact – Body by Science by Doug McGuff, MD and John Little and The Emotion Code by Dr. Bradley Nelson. I’ll tell you more about them below.

But for those who can’t wait here’s a quick summary.

1. Do the 21 Day Purification Program and take advantage of the group incentive!

2. Read the book Body by Science to learn how exercise impacts the body.

3. Read the book The Emotion Code to learn how to “release your trapped emotions for abundant health, love and happiness.” (That’s on the book’s cover.)

Of course if you do not have time to read the books, no problem as those will be my topics over the next few months!

One last note – unfortunately there is a January 1 price increase on many Standard Process products – anywhere from $.50 to $2.00. I will sell my existing inventory at the old prices, so if you need some supplements let me know so you can take advantage of the old prices.


Cleanse Special Offer

I have a special offer this month. It’s a group incentive and here’s how it works. For anyone who purchases the 21 Day Purification Program in January, I will put $1 into the pot. At the end of the month everyone who does the cleanse will get a future product discount based on how many people participate. For example, if 15 people do the cleanse, everyone will get $15 off their next supplement purchase. And an FYI – there are already 6 people on board from the pre-announcement!

If you are interested in participating please call or e-mail so we can arrange for you to pick up your kit!


Body by Science

In the past I’ve written a few articles about exercise. I’ve told you about PACE and PACE Express from Dr. Sears, BurstFit by Dr. Axe, and the Xiser stepper to name a few. All of these techniques are similar in they promote what is called “burst training” or “sprint training” and now “HIT” (high intensity training). All work off a similar premise – the human body was not designed to run a marathon and the average person does not have to spend hours upon hours exercising to get in shape.

In fact, they even boldly state that being fit is not necessarily the same as being healthy and that many people over-exercise which has negative impacts on their health. This has been my experience with many of my clients. They come to me and say, “I don’t get it. I work out every day with my trainer and I keep gaining weight.”

Body by Science explains all the whys behind this. It provides the research and the science behind how exercise impacts the body. Over the next few months I will share this information with you. If you can’t wait, here’s a link to the web site: http://www.bodybyscience.net/home.html/. There are videos, blogs, and other helpful information. I highly recommend it.


The Emotion Code

As many of you are aware, there is more to the body than just the pure physical – there is the emotional and the spiritual as well. True health is not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mind and soul. There is a wide source of literature and studies supporting the role of emotion in our health. It is the basis for a variety of “energetic medicine” type practices.

The Emotion Code focuses on Dr. Bradley Nelson’s work with his chiropractic patients not only on their physical level, but on their emotional (and spiritual) level as well. He has found how emotions create the physical symptoms of his patients and by clearing the emotions the patient returns to health.

The book explains it all and gives the reader the tools to release their trapped emotions. Here’s a link to his website for more information. Warning – he’s selling all kinds of stuff which is usually a red flag for me, but all you really need is the book – so if you’re interested just start there before you go crazy buying stuff!!

And, over the next few months I’ll offer more insight in the newsletters as well. Here’s the link: http://www.healerslibrary.com/

Happy New Year! My best wishes to you, your family, and your loved ones for a healthy, happy, and prosperous New Year!

Bernie

Nutrition Made Simple – Why Sugar is Bad For You

Of course this is nothing new. If there’s one thing that almost everyone in the nutrition world agrees on is that sugar is bad. It’s really quite simple. Sugar disrupts how your body works. Here’s how (in no particular order):

1. Sugar depresses your immune system for up to five hours after you consume it.

2. Sugar depletes key vitamins and nutrients, particularly your B vitamins and minerals.

3. Sugar feeds the “bad” bacteria, fungus, yeast, and parasites.

4. Sugar feeds cancer cells.

5. Sugar fuels hormone imbalances by raising insulin levels which effects thyroid, adrenal, and sex hormone balance.

If you want to get the full picture click here and see over 150 reasons how sugar ruins your health! http://nancyappleton.com/141-reasons-sugar-ruins-your-health/.