Category Archives: The Body Positive

March 2016 Newsletter – March on Minerals!

March on Minerals!
Hard to believe it is March 1, especially as I look out my window and see some snow coming down! Fortunately it does not look like the 4-8 inches that they were predicting last night!

In a couple of weeks the NCAA’s March Madness begins – several crazy weeks of college basketball coming up! On the theme of madness and crazy this month’s newsletter looks at minerals. Why? Certain minerals are calming to the nervous system. They’ll help us cope with the pressure of how our bracket is doing in the office pool!

But in all seriousness, minerals are essential to our life. While minerals in general are involved in all our functions there are specific minerals that are utilized by specific endocrine glands. See below for the minerals and glands pairings.

The only way to get minerals is to eat them! Our bodies do not make them. Please enjoy the articles below on the importance of minerals.


Magnesium and Calcium: Are You Deficient?

We hear a lot about the importance of calcium and magnesium to our health. I’ve attended several seminars recently where this was emphasized. One presenter said he checks for calcium, magnesium, and other minerals on all his clients. Why are minerals so important to us? They assist the body in energy production – minerals contain no calories or energy. They work with vitamins and enzymes to fuel all our metabolic processes. Our health cannot be optimized if these processes are impaired.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=675

Links to Additional Articles on Minerals

Here’s some additional articles on minerals:
The Three Minerals You Need to Balance Your Nervous System: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=33

Know Your Nutrients – A Few More Important Minerals: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=154

Minerals for A Strong Immune System: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=161

Minerals for Healthy Bones: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=168

Minerals and Glands
As mentioned above specific minerals are essential to the proper functioning of specific glands in the body. Here is a list:
Pituitary Gland – Manganese
Thyroid Gland – Iodine
Pancreas – Chromium
Adrenal Gland – Copper
Prostate Gland and Uterus – Zinc
Testicles and Ovaries – Selenium

For more information on the endocrine glands here’s the link to the page that links to all my previous articles: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?cat=11

For more information on the prostate gland here’s two articles:
Healthy Prostate Part 1: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=265

Healthy Prostate Part 2: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=264

February 2016 Newsletter – Happy Valentine’s Day and Heart Health

The beginning of February means Valentine’s Day is approaching and with it our attention turns to matters of the heart. Last year I attended two excellent seminars on the heart. The last one I attended was presented by Dr. Michael Gaeta in December 2015 which was his synopsis of Mark Anderson’s Back to School for Doctors 2015 presentation along with his own special insights from his over 25 years of practice. Some interesting tidbits of information and my summary articles are in the first feature article below.

In a related story just this last week, the Express from the United Kingdom featured an article illustrating how the conventional medicine solution of taking a statin for heart health has been linked to an increased risk for diabetes. You can read that article by clicking here: http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/639586/Statins-doubles-diabetes-study-drug.

Last month’s newsletter featured several articles about what to eat and how to exercise. I noticed that I have changed a few ideas about the top foods to eat, so I have written a new article to summarize which I call “The Road to Better Health Starts with Food.” You can link to it here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=661.

Many of you have asked about my trip to Argentina. It was fantastic, once we got there! It was great to meet and be with Susana’s family and to meet some of her closest lifelong friends, to spend time on the beach, relax, and to see the city of Buenos Aires. Some of you were following the adventure on Facebook. There was a bit of drama with American Airlines. If you want some entertainment you can read the details below!

Dr. Michael Gaeta and Heart Health

Here’s a few of the tidbits Dr.Gaeta shared that I thought were of interest to pass along.

One half of all deaths in the United States are caused by clots. This includes heart attacks and strokes. Thus preventing clots can go a long way in life extension. The solution to preventing clots is a natural substance called rutin. Rutin is part of Vitamin P, which is part of the Vitamin C complex. Vitamin P stands for permeability. It is the collagen formation factor. We need collagen for tissue and vascular integrity. Collagen keeps the body tissues strong. It is the “glue” that holds them together. Plaquing occurs when there is low collagen. Plaque is made from calcium and cholesterol. It is placed where there is inflammation in the body. Damage to the vasculature has caused inflammation. There is not sufficient collagen to repair, thus in comes the plaque.

For more detailed information regarding heart disease and stroke and rutin I encourage you to see my heart health series of blogs.

Part 1 – Introduction and Heart Rate: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=390
Part 2 – Rhythm of the Heart: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=449
Part 3 – Toning the Heart: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=529

More tidbits:

One third of the United States population is diabetic or pre-diabetic. 90% of those who are pre-diabetic are unaware. Two-thirds of US adults are overweight and one-third of US children are overweight.

Synthetic vitamins have been shown to increase the risk of death by 8-16%. This is why I use food based vitamins in my practice.

Since statins have been in use the studies show that cardiovascular disease risk has gone down (as the drug companies will point out), but..all death mortality has increased. There is a 43% increase in the cases of diabetes if they are taking statins. The bottom line – the statin is causing something else to kill you before heart disease!

The ideal spread for blood pressure is 40 points. That is where the traditional 120/80 comes from. The bigger the difference between the two numbers, the greater the stress is on the arteries. Interestingly enough, one-half of strokes take place in people with normal blood pressure. Since that is the case it puts into question the concept that high blood pressure causes strokes.

For the full blog article on tidbits from Dr. Gaeta click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=658.

If you’d like to learn more about Dr. Gaeta, here’s a link to his website: https://michaelgaeta.com/

The Road to Better Health Starts with Food
With the New Year upon us many of us make the resolution to be healthier. In most cases that is interpreted as losing weight. Many of us will join the gym and begin to exercise. For some that will be sufficient as the last few holiday pounds come off. However, to ensure better health in the long term that is not the solution. The road to better health starts with food and drink – what we are putting into our body.

My purpose in this article is to be straight forward and make it simple. Here are the foods I recommend you eat on a regular basis, unless of course you are allergic. These foods emphasize what lacks in many American diets – vegetables and fruit for vitamins and minerals to fuel our metabolism, healthy sources of protein to build our bodies, and healthy fats that are sources of Omega 3’s and vitamins A, D, E, and K. If you want more details about these foods see my blog and other nutrition resources.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=661.

American Airlines – Not A Healthy Company
While Argentina was great I have nothing good to say about American Airlines. In summary we missed connections, were delayed over 12 hours, and after all that our bags did not arrive with us. And the worst part of all is they really did not seem to care. For my mental health and for your amusement you can read all the details and the back and forth communication.

While I know it has nothing to do with my health. The stress of the whole ordeal with American also was not healthy. My experience and the customer rankings that were in a recent Wall Street Journal article I reference suggest you can make a better choice of who to fly with and I would encourage you to do so.

Here’s a link to information from that article: http://www.chron.com/business/article/Wall-Street-Journal-names-the-best-and-worst-6759326.php

My complaint letter, truly one for the ages!! http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=663

Their non-customer oriented response, basically a form letter filling in my name and dates: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=665

My response back, telling them I was not satisfied with their offer: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=667

And their final short and sweet back to me telling me to get lost: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=669

I have since filed a complaint with the FAA and they have forwarded that to American. Hopefully I’ll get a more customer focused person.

January 2016 Newsletter – Happy New Year!!

Happy New Year!! Wow – 2016!

Through the magic of the Internet I can send out this newsletter while still out of the country! I will be back in the office on Friday January 8 just for product pickup with appointments resuming on Monday January 11.

This is the time of New Year’s Resolutions – to eat better and to exercise regularly. So, I’m here to help and make it simple. This month’s newsletter looks at some gems from the past – the best foods to eat and the best way to exercise and the best book on nutrition!

The Best Book on Nutrition

She’s been telling us to eat fat for over 20 years. Always ahead of her times, Ann Louise Gittleman has revised and updated her book Eat Fat, Lose Weight. This was the first book of its kind when it came out. I encourage you to read it. For a nice overview of the book, click here: http://annlouise.com/2015/11/20/debunking-those-big-fat-lies/

What to Eat – 20 Foods You Should Have in Your Diet
I have run these articles several times in the past, but the truth is, that there’s nothing really new in what is healthy to eat! While the articles each highlight ten foods as you read them you’ll see there are actually quite a few more listed that relate to the one identified.

The first ten foods are: Blueberries, Apples, Kale, Almonds, Quinoa, Wild Salmon, Avocado, Kefir, Coconut Oil, and Butter. To read why click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=78

The second ten foods are: Broccoli, Garlic, Sweet Potatoes, Eggs, Whey Protein, Water, Cranberry Juice, Olive Oil, Grass Fed Beef, and Brown Rice. To read why click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=77

The Most Efficient Exercise
In the past I’ve written a few articles about exercise. I’ve told you about PACE and PACE Express from Dr. Sears, BurstFit by Dr. Axe, and the Xiser stepper to name a few. All of these techniques are similar in they promote what is called “burst training” or “sprint training” and now “HIT” (high intensity training). All work off a similar premise – the human body was not designed to run a marathon and the average person does not have to spend hours upon hours exercising to get in shape.

In fact, they even boldly state that being fit is not necessarily the same as being healthy and that many people over-exercise which has negative impacts on their health. This has been my experience with many of my clients. They come to me and say, “I don’t get it. I work out every day with my trainer and I keep gaining weight.”

Body by Science explains all the whys behind this. It provides the research and the science behind how exercise impacts the body. I wrote a series of four articles which are listed below.

1. Introduction to Body by Science
2. The Cardio Myth
3. Fat Metabolism
4. Genetic Expression

So, without further ado, let’s get to Body by Science.

Getting Started With Body by Science

“I don’t understand. I work out every day and I’m still gaining weight.” Believe it or not I hear this question quite frequently. On the surface it seems to be quite the paradox. All the conventional wisdom tells us to lose weight all we need to do is watch what we eat (meaning to eat less) and exercise more. Follow this simple formula: use more calories than you take in.

In the past I’ve explained part of this myth – how all calories are not created equal. Based on what the calorie is from (protein, fat, or carbohydrate) it will have a different effect in your body. If you need a refresher you can find that article on my blog at http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=135.

Now let’s explore the other half of the equation: exercise more. This of course leads to a series of questions. What type of exercise is best? How many times a week should I exercise? How long should I exercise?

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=27

The Cardio Myth
This article addresses the cardio myth. The recommended method of exercise is what he terms high intensity training (or HIT). It benefits both the aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways. Most “cardio” only works the aerobic pathway.

High intensity training is in many ways the complete opposite of what is now known as “cardio.” HIT is designed to be short and sweet. The techniques work the major muscle groups to exhaustion and then you must stop, rest, and then begin the next exercise. Cardio is designed to be lower intensity so that you can perform the exercise without stopping, usually anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=26

Exercise and Hormones: Fat Burning (Yes) and Fat Storing (oh no!)

This article offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”
The effectiveness of exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism and blood glucose levels. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=21

It’s In Your Genes: Ten Factors That Influence Exercise Outcomes
One of my favorite parts in Body by Science is the discussion of genetic expression. It plays a major role in our physical appearance. People can do similar types of exercise but in the end their genes determine how their physical activity is expressed in their body.
Quite simply there are certain things that are meant to be and they aren’t going to change. They show a picture of a forest of the same type of tree, yet one is significantly taller than the others. If you only saw it, you’d assume it was the norm, but in fact it is the exception.

These same basic principles apply to the human body. Some people are the way they are simply because of genetics. Two people could do the exact same workout but based on their genes one can emerge as a championship body builder and the other will not.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=17
Here’s a link to the web site: http://www.bodybyscience.net/home.html/. There are videos, blogs, and other helpful information. I highly recommend it.

Some Learning Tidbits from Dr. Michael Gaeta’s Cardiovascular Seminar

I’ve mentioned before how much I love to learn and how continual education is one of the things I enjoy best about my job. On the path of education I’ve been blessed to come across many outstanding teachers who have had great influence on me and my practice. They include, in alphabetical order: Mark Anderson, Dr. Bruce Bond, Dr. Davis Brockenshire, Dr. Robert Cass, Ann Louise Gittleman, Dr. Chad Guess, Dr. Annette Schippel, Dr. Joe Teff, Dr. Randy Tent, Dr. Stuart White. And now I’m adding to that list Dr. Michael Gaeta.

I’ve attended several of his seminars and they are all excellent. The last one I attended was his cardiovascular seminar in December 2015. This was a synopsis of Mark Anderson’s Back to School for Doctors 2015 presentation along with Dr. Gaeta’s insights.

Here’s a few of the tidbits he shared that I thought were of interest to share.

One half of all deaths in the United States are caused by clots. This includes heart attacks and strokes. Thus preventing clots can go a long way in life extension. The solution to preventing clots is a natural substance called rutin. Rutin is part of Vitamin P, which is part of the Vitamin C complex. Vitamin P stands for permeability. It is the collagen formation factor. We need collagen for tissue and vascular integrity. Collagen keeps the body tissues strong. It is the “glue” that holds them together. Plaquing occurs when there is low collagen. Plaque is made from calcium and cholesterol. It is placed where there is inflammation in the body. Damage to the vasculature has caused inflammation. There is not sufficient collagen to repair, thus in comes the plaque.

For more detailed information regarding heart disease and stroke and rutin I encourage you to see my heart health series of blogs.

One third of the United States population is diabetic or pre-diabetic. 90% of those who are pre-diabetic are unaware. Two-thirds of US adults are overweight and one-third of US children are overweight.

Synthetic vitamins have been shown to increase the risk of death by 8-16%. This is why I use food based vitamins in my practice.
Since statins have been in use the studies show that cardiovascular disease risk has gone down (as the drug companies will point out), but..all death mortality has increased. There is a 43% increase in the cases of diabetes if they are taking statins. The bottom line – the statin is causing something else to kill you before heart disease!

The ideal spread for blood pressure is 40 points. That is where the traditional 120/80 comes from. The bigger the difference between the two numbers, the greater the stress is on the arteries. Interestingly enough, one-half of strokes take place in people with normal blood pressure. Since that is the case it puts into question the concept that high blood pressure causes strokes.

Our bones are one-third mineral, one-third protein (collagen), and one-third water.

Every day 50,000 gall bladders are removed! This is highly preventable through better diet.

74% of the US population is deficient in magnesium.

Nutrients for a Healthy Heart: Part 2 – Rhythm of the Heart

As mentioned in a previous article rate, rhythm, and tone are the key measurements of heart health. Rate is the speed at which the heart beats. This is influenced by the autonomic nervous system and two key minerals: potassium and phosphorus. This was featured in the previous article. Rhythm refers to how blood moves through the vasculature. This is influenced by the integrity of the vasculature tissues, electrical signaling, rutin (part of the Vitamin C complex), and by the mineral calcium. Rhythm will be discussed in this article with particular focus on vascular integrity. Tone refers to the muscular strength of the heart. This is influenced primarily by Vitamins B, C, and E. Tone will be addressed in the next article.

One of the key elements to cardiovascular health is vascular integrity, particularly of the capillaries, the tiniest component of the circulatory system, that make up approximately 60% of the vasculature. They transfer blood from the arteries to the veins and are considered the weakest spot of the system. Damage to the vasculature will cause leaky blood vessels which may ultimately result in ruptures and clots. This will inhibit the smooth flow of blood through the circulatory system.

Ruptures cause blood and oxygen to leak which will reduce overall energy and efficiency of the heart creating conditions for a variety of disease pathways; while clots lead to strokes. Clots initially will inhibit blood flow, but will eventually break off and float around the blood stream causing more damage when an organ is cut off from receiving oxygen via the blood.

Rutin, part of the Vitamin C complex (note the complex, not ascorbic acid as found in most supplements) is a critical nutrient as it has been found to prevent capillary damage, protect against strokes, break up blood clots, prevent protein degeneration, and even protect against X-rays. While some Harvard researchers claimed credit for discovering this in 2012, it is well documented in writings from 1947!

The best source of rutin is buckwheat, but it is also prevalent in onions and tea. Harvard Magazine said, “Indeed, if scientists had tried to design a clot-preventing molecule, they could scarcely have created one more perfect than rutin.” The Journal of Clinical Investigation calls rutin a “therapy for the prevention and treatment of stroke and heart attack, as well as deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism.”

Rutin (also known as a flavonoid and originally referred to as Vitamin P) is part of the Vitamin C complex. I have written in the past the difference between vitamin complexes and synthetic vitamins. On most vitamin bottles you will see Vitamin C labeled as ascorbic acid. They are not the same! Ascorbic acid is the outer layer of the Vitamin C complex which contains several other factors.

An article in Collier’s (March 15, 1947) points out the failure of ascorbic acid to cure certain deficiency diseases including capillary fragility due to the lack of the full C-Complex. The article continues, “Rutin has been valuable in treating many bleeding diseases due to fragile capillaries…” For a refresher on how vitamin C and ascorbic acid are not the same you can view this article on my blog: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=181.

Here’s a little more insight into how this works in your body. The lining of the capillaries is a single layer of cells (endothelium). Behind the endothelium are the muscle cells of the vessels which are made primarily of collagen (the main protein making up these muscle cells and also the main protein in your body holding it together!). Collagen is made from protein, Vitamin C and Vitamin P (rutin). Collagen fibers add strength, density, and flexibility to the walls of the blood vessels; thus making them more resistant to damage.

An injury to the vessel lining exposes collagen fibers which platelets in the blood adhere to. At the same time platelets release chemicals that make nearby platelets sticky and a clot is formed. The most common form of a heart attack occurs when a blood clot blocks a coronary artery. Stroke occurs when a clot obstructs an artery supplying blood to the brain.

But there’s more to the rutin story. A 2012 study published in the International Current Pharmaceutical Journal found that rutin also breaks up existing clots!

In summary, we have learned that rutin prevents clots by strengthening the blood vessels and it also can break up existing clots. That’s powerful stuff! And, while I don’t have space here to provide the details, it also has been shown to prevent harm from exposure to x-rays – again this is due to its properties in strengthening blood vessel walls to prevent hemorrhaging which is a result of excess radiation. This comes from a Science magazine article from 1948!

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Nutrients for a Healthy Heart: Part I – Introduction and Heart Rate

I love to learn! It’s probably one of the most enjoyable aspects in my line of work. I am always learning. I have to, to keep up with the latest nutrition information. Be it from my clients, other practitioners, or at educational seminars – it is a continuous process. The best part of the process is once I learn something new I can apply it in my practice and pass it on to my clients and the public.

Recently I attended a seminar on cardiovascular health (Cardiovascular: Performance, Endurance, and Maintenance). While the new information is still circulating (pun intended) through my system, I’ll be sharing it with you through a series of articles.

Let’s start with a few basic facts about your heart. The adult heart weighs about 8-10 ounces, yet it is more electrical than the brain (which weighs five times as much). It contracts about 100,000 times during the day pumping six quarts of blood through over 100,000 miles of arteries, veins, and capillaries. The basics of circulation are as follows: The heart pumps oxygenated blood through the arteries to the organs and tissues. At the same time veins carry deoxygenated blood from the organs and tissues back to the heart. The deoxygenated blood goes to the lungs to get oxygen and is then pumped out again to the organs and tissues. This process is repeated over and over.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the US. Each year there are 1.6 million heart attacks, with over a half million of those being fatal. And, each year there are 795,000 strokes, with 140,000 deaths. Approximately one-third of the deaths in the US each year are caused by heart disease and strokes.

This leads to the question of whether heart disease and strokes can be avoided or reduced. It appears that medicine has many theories on treating heart disease, but actual success has yet to be achieved as evidenced by the continued increase in deaths. Perhaps this is why JAMA (the Journal of the American Medical Association) reported in February of 2009 that just 11% of the more than 2,700 recommendations approved by cardiologists for treating heart patients are actually supported by high-quality scientific testing!

There are lots of recommendations, but very few proving successful. In this and subsequent articles I will share with you nutritional information which has been proven over the last 60-70 years to enhance cardiovascular health. Ironically some of it is just now being “discovered” by today’s researchers.

Rate, rhythm, and tone are the key measurements of heart health. Rate is the speed at which the heart beats. This is influenced by the autonomic nervous system and two key minerals: potassium and phosphorus. Rhythm refers to how blood moves through the vasculature. This is influenced by the integrity of the vasculature tissues, electrical signaling and by the mineral calcium. Tone refers to the muscular strength of the heart. This is influenced primarily by Vitamins B, C, and E. The rest of this article will discuss nutrients related to heart rate. Subsequent articles will cover rhythm and tone.

The brain controls the heart rate, but interestingly enough does not directly innervate the heart. All the heart needs to beat is oxygen, which is why a heart will still beat when not connected to the body.

The heart rate is controlled by the autonomic nervous system and its two components – the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems. The sympathetic nervous system manages our stress response (generally described as “fight or flight”) thus it will accelerate the heart. Whether we are going to fight the tiger or run from it either way we need to get moving and we need more blood flow. The increase to our heart rate gets the job done. Our parasympathetic nervous system is engaged for more normal functioning or when we are relaxed. Therefore less blood flow is necessary and the heart rate will be inhibited or lowered.

Potassium is an alkaline ash mineral used by the parasympathetic nervous system while phosphorus is an acid ash mineral used by the sympathetic nervous system. For optimal heart health you need both these minerals. Phosphorus is the key ingredient in ATP which is essential for cellular energy which fuels the heart and the body. Without sufficient phosphorus the body will be energy deficient. At the same time the body needs potassium for when it needs to curb energy (or excess energy) production. Without potassium, there will be no constraint on phosphorus and the sympathetic nervous system will continue to fire.

One of the ways potassium gets depleted is through a high carbohydrate/sugar diet. The sugar needs to be stored in the liver and muscles and takes potassium along with it. A high carbohydrate dinner can be particularly dangerous as a potassium deficiency can be created causing the heart to work extra hard during the night. Perhaps this explains how you hear of people dying in their sleep, particularly after a big meal!

In addition to heart rate, the autonomic nervous system controls many significant bodily functions including breathing, metabolism, emotional responses and digestion just to name a few. While I only discussed heart rate above, you can certainly well imagine how autonomic dysfunction caused by a deficiency in potassium or phosphorus can cause a wide range of symptoms as other parts of the body goes out of balance.

Typical symptoms of phosphorus deficiency include: morning stiffness, nausea, cramping when in one position for a long time, being a slow starter in the morning, sensitivity to cold weather, edema, high blood pressure, insomnia, restlessness, leg cramps, tight feeling in chest, headaches, irritability, throbbing sensations, excess tarter buildup on teeth, and gastric hyperacidity.
Typical symptoms of potassium deficiency include: frequent sighing, dislike for closed rooms, hyperirritability, cold sweats, and dehydration (dryness of mouth, skin, dry hard stools, diminished urination and perspiration).

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

It’s In Your Genes: Ten Factors That Influence Exercise Outcomes

I have recently introduced you to the book Body by Science by Doug McDuff, MD and John Little. This book offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. Genetic expression plays a major role in our physical appearance. People can do similar types of exercise but in the end their genes determine how their physical activity is expressed in their body.

One of my favorite parts in Body by Science is the discussion of genetic expression. Quite simply there are certain things that are meant to be and they aren’t going to change. They show a picture of a forest of the same type of tree, yet one is significantly taller than the others. If you only saw it, you’d assume it was the norm, but in fact it is the exception.

These same basic principles apply to the human body. Some people are the way they are simply because of genetics. Two people could do the exact same workout but based on their genes one can emerge as a championship body builder and the other will not.

Here’s a look at ten genetic factors that come into play.

1. Somatotype – a fancy word for body types. There are three main body types for humans. Endomorphy is the tendency towards soft and round body contours. Mesmorphy is the tendency towards being more muscular. Ectomorphy is the tendency towards being skinnier. What you are is what you have to work with. The ectomorph will have a hard time becoming an Olympic weight lifter!

2. Muscle length determines how long a muscle can become, which will ultimately determine how large it can be.

3. Muscle fiber density determines the mass potential for the muscle. If it can have more fibers, it can become larger.

4. Skeletal formation – this will also impact how large a muscle can become based on how and where it attaches to the bones.

5. Neuromuscular efficiency – how wells nerves and muscles communicate will impact how well the muscles can develop.

6. Myostatin – this is a protein produced due to gene GDF-8 (growth and differentiation factor 8). This protein stops the muscles from becoming too large. So, a particular expression of this gene will allow muscles to grow larger than the might ordinarily be.

7. Interleukin-15 – this gene has various combinations which has associations to how one’s muscle size will respond to exercise.

8. Alpha-Actinin-3 – this is a protein component of fast-twitch muscle. Eighteen percent of the population lacks it while all champion athletes have been found to have it.

9. Myosin Light Chain Kinase – this is an enzyme that supports how your muscles build. Some people experience more muscle damage with exertion so should have a longer recovery time meaning they should train less frequently to maximize results.

10. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme – an enzyme that determines vascular tone. This influences exercise endurance.

So there you have it. What does it all mean? Set realistic expectations and goals around your exercise program. Accept who you are and the exercise you can perform. Some areas are out of your control and pushing beyond your body’s genetic design is not going to get you anywhere.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

April 2015 Newsletter: No April Fool’s Here: Serious Stuff for Your Health

I hope you are enjoying the series of articles based on the book Body by Science. This month’s newsletter features the third installment discussing the all important area of the hormonal impact of exercise. Unfortunately this is one of the most misunderstood aspects of exercise. While exercise has many benefits, improper exercise can create hormone imbalances. Hormones determine and drive most of our body’s functions, thus hormone imbalances can be at the root of many disturbing symptoms. For a refresher on hormones click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?cat=11

One of the best newsletters I receive is from Dr. Bruce West. Each month is packed with valuable information. His February issue was one of the best ever and I wanted to share a few of his nutritional nuggets from that issue. This article follows below.


New stuff in the office: Supplements for pets and water tests.

Did you know that almost 70% of pets in U.S. households are on medications? I was shocked, but I guess not surprised when I read that in an article about Pfizer’s pet drug division. Many of my clients have pets at home and they are just concerned about their pet’s health as their own. Standard Process has an excellent line of pet products, particularly for cats, dogs, and horses. I have several clients who are aware of this and I am able to supply them with product. If you are interested let me know.

Ever wonder if your water supply is safe. I’ve come across some easy do it yourself home water tests from Silver Lake Research. I have in stock the well water test kit ($25) and the city water test kit ($20). For more information on the test kits you can click here: https://www.discovertesting.com/products/display_products_overviews.sd?iid=1&headtitle=Drinking%20Water%20Test%20Kits
If you are interested give me a call or send an email.


Exercise and Hormones: Fat Burning (Yes) and Fat Storing (oh no!)

I have recently introduced you to the book Body by Science by Doug McDuff, MD and John Little. This book offers a clear explanation of the actual science of exercise, how activity relates to hormones, and how this determines what happens in your body. In short, it answers the question I am frequently asked. “Why am I gaining weight when I am working out every day?”

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. The effectiveness of exercise is all about hormones, fat metabolism and blood glucose levels. Hormones signal the body to burn fat and to store fat. High intensity training works the major muscle groups to exhaustion, uses up glucose, and encourages the body to burn fat and build muscle.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=21


Nutritional Nuggets from Dr. Bruce West

One of my favorite nutrition publications I get is Health Alert by Dr. Bruce West. Each month I look forward to the latest edition. The official title is Health Alert: When All Other Treatments Fail. I think you get the picture. Dr. West is a Chiropractor and a big fan of Standard Process products. He is also a big fan of the truth. February’s issue was full of juicy nuggets that I’d like to share.

Nugget #1: Almost all treatment for heart disease is unnecessary!

Nugget #2: Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes!

Nugget #3: Heart attacks are not caused by clogged arteries!

Nugget #4: Multiple sclerosis is directly linked to poor gut flora!

To read the complete post click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=19

Nutritional Nuggets from Dr. West’s Health Alert

One of my favorite nutrition publications I get is Health Alert by Dr. Bruce West. Each month I look forward to the latest edition. The official title is Health Alert: When All Other Treatments Fail. I think you get the picture. Dr. West is a Chiropractor and a big fan of Standard Process products. He is also a big fan of the truth. February’s issue was full of juicy nuggets that I’d like to share.

Nugget #1: Almost all treatment for heart disease is unnecessary! Dr. West states that most of the cardiac procedures are all band-aids as they ignore the underlying issue and are unnecessary for 70% of patients. He also cites a study showing five behaviors in men cause 86% of all heart attacks. I’m sure you can pretty much guess what they are: smoking, eating too much, drinking too much, a big stomach (as a result of eating and drinking too much), and being inactive. His conclusion – it’s about lifestyle!

Nugget #2: Artificial sweeteners cause diabetes! A study of mice showed that consuming artificial sweeteners such as saccharin, sucralose (Splenda), and aspartame (Equal, Sweet n low) cause glucose intolerance or type 2 diabetes. In the study one group of mice was fed the artificial sweeteners and another group fed sugar. The ones fed sugar did not develop diabetes, just the artificial sweetener group. This was replicated in a small group of healthy human subjects who were placed on a diet containing artificial sweeteners. Within just one week over 50% of the humans developed glucose intolerance!

How does this happen? The artificial sweeteners alter our gut flora in the large intestines which changes our metabolism to favor glucose intolerance. This was proven by transplanting feces from the two groups of mice into germ-free mice. The mice that got the feces from the artificial sweetener fed mice developed diabetes. Not so with the mice getting feces from the sugar fed mice. This proves the artificial sweeteners affected the gut flora and led to glucose intolerance!

Nugget #3: Heart attacks are not caused by clogged arteries! Coronary artery blockages rarely cause heart attacks because of the body’s ability to create its own natural bypass system. Go to the website www.heartattacknew.com and see for yourself what the body does on its own! What really causes heart attacks are imbalances in the autonomic nervous system and nutrient deficiencies (particularly B-complex deficiencies – see my article on Vitamin B4 – click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=38.


Nugget #4:
Multiple sclerosis is directly linked to poor gut flora! MS is an autoimmune disease and 80% of your immune system is in our gut and its flora. It turns out that the gut microbes in people with MS are different than those without it! The gut flora of MS patients have bacteria that cause inflammation and other MS symptoms and they lack the bacteria that help control inflammation! Once again we see the importance of the health of our gut flora. Remember we have 20,000 genes. The bacteria in our gut has 1,000,000 genes!

March 2015 Newsletter: Exercise, Science, and the Cardio Myth

“I Don’t Get it. I Work Out Every Day with My Trainer and Can’t Lose Weight.”

Is this you? It is many of my clients. And, I hear this statement more often than you’d think. What’s going on? In January I introduced you to the book Body by Science. This month you’ll learn more of the details. I have a series of four articles to share with you which capture the major themes from the book. The first two appear in this newsletter. The four articles are:

1. Introduction to Body by Science

2. The Cardio Myth

3. Fat Metabolism

4. Genetic Expression

So, without further ado, let’s get to Body by Science.

Getting Started With Body by Science

“I don’t understand. I work out every day and I’m still gaining weight.” Believe it or not I hear this question quite frequently. On the surface it seems to be quite the paradox. All the conventional wisdom tells us to lose weight all we need to do is watch what we eat (meaning to eat less) and exercise more. Follow this simple formula: use more calories than you take in.

In the past I’ve explained part of this myth – how all calories are not created equal. Based on what the calorie is from (protein, fat, or carbohydrate) it will have a different effect in your body. If you need a refresher you can find that article on my blog at http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=135.

Now let’s explore the other half of the equation: exercise more. This of course leads to a series of questions. What type of exercise is best? How many times a week should I exercise? How long should I exercise?

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=27

The Cardio Myth

In the introductory article I summarized his key points. In this article I will address one of those key points. His recommended method of exercise is what he terms high intensity training (or HIT). It benefits both the aerobic and anaerobic energy pathways. Most “cardio” only works the aerobic pathway.

High intensity training is in many ways the complete opposite of what is now known as “cardio.” HIT is designed to be short and sweet. The techniques work the major muscle groups to exhaustion and then you must stop, rest, and then begin the next exercise. Cardio is designed to be lower intensity so that you can perform the exercise without stopping, usually anywhere from 45 minutes to an hour.

For the rest of the article click here: http://brwellness.com/nutrition-news/?p=26