Category Archives: Breakfast Ideas

What Does Your Nutrition Consultant Eat?

As a nutrition consultant, one of the most frequent questions I’m asked by clients, friends, and other curious people is, “So, what do you eat?” That’s a fair question right? You certainly want your nutrition consultant to be eating healthy foods! You wouldn’t want them eating donuts for breakfast and fast food burgers and fries for lunch and dinner. Nothing worse than the doctor who smokes cigarettes! So, here’s a look at what I typically eat:

Breakfast: I’m a big fan of a protein shake/smoothie in the morning. I find them to be filling and satisfying and easily last me until lunch time. My basic ingredients are 8 ounces of water (or a special cranwater concoction), a high quality protein mix (either whey, brown rice, pea, or some combination of these – never soy!), a cup of berries (blueberries, strawberries, or raspberries or some combination of them) either fresh or frozen, a handful of nuts and/or seeds (Brazil nuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, pumpkin seeds), some fresh greens or green powder, flax seed oil or ground flax seeds or chia seeds, and on occasion some yogurt and/or kefir. What does this provide? Plenty of protein, vitamins, minerals, fiber, and omega 3 and 6 fats. On the days that I don’t have a smoothie, I’ll have eggs on some steamed leafy greens, in an omelet with a bunch of vegetables, or with some raw sauerkraut.

Lunch: Generally 2-3 days of the week it will be one of the egg dishes that I describe above. Other days it will be based on leftovers from the previous night’s dinner. There is usually some type of animal protein involved, it can be grass fed beef, turkey, fish, chicken, and occasionally lamb. During the warmer months I tend to have more raw vegetables in some type of salad and during the cooler months more cooked vegetables and soups. I use a homemade salad dressing from olive oil and vinegar. On occasion there will be a sandwich on some form of gluten free or sprouted grain, brown rice, lentils, or quinoa.

Dinner: Dinner is similar to lunch on the days I don’t have eggs. There will be an animal protein along with several types of vegetables usually steamed, stir-fried in coconut oil, or baked. Once a week or so I’ll do my baked sweet potato fries. On about 2-3 of the days I’ll also have a whole grain side of brown rice, quinoa, or brown rice pasta.

I’m not a big snacker. As I said, the smoothie usually lasts me until lunch. Sometimes between lunch and dinner I’ll get a little hungry and I’ll have a hard-boiled egg, a protein bar, a piece of fruit, a handful of nuts, or a bit of cheese.

What basic guidelines am I following? I don’t skip meals. I’m having protein at each meal. I’m eating lots of vegetables of all different varieties and colors, both cooked and raw. I’m limiting my carbohydrates in the form of grains, only doing whole grains, and not more than once per day. I make sure I get high quality fats from the coconut oil, olive oil, flax seed oil, and organic butter or ghee. I eat real food, avoiding processed and refined foods. I have an occasional sweet, but of good quality. Nothing like a homemade organic chocolate chip cookie! And, I have an occasional sweet of not so good quality – yes you may run into me at Dairy Queen occasionally! And I do still love my pizza, but usually once a month at the most. I try to limit eating out.

As I tell my clients, the most critical component is to control your home environment. If it is not in your house, you’re not going to eat it, and after a while a nightly trip to go get ice cream will get tiring!

I do use some supplements for additional nutritional support, but that will be the subject for next time!

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

July 2013 Newsletter – Become Independently Healthy!

Happy July 4 – Independence Day!

This holiday is all about freedom. One freedom we’d all like to enjoy is to be free from illness and disease. While not 100% completely within our control there are lifestyle choices we make every day that carry substantial influence. The biggest killers: heart disease, diabetes, and cancer, have all been linked to lifestyle choices. This is another freedom we enjoy – the freedom to choose what we eat and what we do. While you may not be ready to follow my advice 100% of the time (even I don’t follow my advice 100% of the time) this month’s newsletter features three simple things you can do which will have profound effects on improving your health and how you feel on a daily basis.

Before I get to those, a reminder of my upcoming schedule:

Minneapolis, Minnesota – Devanadi Yoga (July 16) **TIME CHANGE**

Nutrition Basics, 8:00-11:00 AM

Nutritional Anatomy, 12:30-3:30 PM

For more information and to register click here http://www.devanadiyoga.com/

Rhinelander, Wisconsin – The University of Wisconsin School of the Arts (July 20-21)

Rejuvenation and Relaxation, July 20, 8:30-11:45 AM

What the Heck Should I Eat and Why, July 20, 1:30-4:45 PM

From Head to Toe: What Your Body is Telling You, July 21, 8:30-11:45 AM

Meet Your Hormone, July 21, 1:30-4:45 PM

For more information and to register click here http://continuingstudies.wisc.edu/lsa/soa/index.html

Make Water Your Beverage of Choice

Making water your beverage of choice has two significant impacts. First, most people simply do not drink enough water. Water is essential to life. Our body is made of lots of water and our body utilizes it in many complex chemical reactions that are the basis of life. Of course this leads to the next logical questions – how much and what kind?

How much water should you drink? That will vary with how much water you eat (yes vegetables, fruit, and even meat contain water). My rule of thumb – if you are running to the bathroom every 30 minutes you are probably drinking too much water! What kind of water should you drink? Yes, we hear about the chlorine, fluoride, chemical, industrial waste, antibiotics, and hormone residues in our drinking water supplies; the BPA in the plastic bottles; and all the different kinds of water systems you can have installed in your house (reverse osmosis, oxygenated, etc). It can become overwhelming.

My advice is to just drink water and not necessarily worry about all that stuff. I really don’t think too many people have gotten ill and died from drinking too much water on a regular basis. The heart of the issue is more likely all the other toxins we consume which eventually overwhelms our body’s ability to detoxify itself. Yes, filtered water that you drink from a glass container is probably optimal, but the simple first step is to drink more water.

The second benefit of water as your choice of beverage is that you drink less of other unhealthy choices such as: soda (both diet and regular), fruit juices (yes, even those with “no added sugar” are still loaded with sugar), and some other ones that I won’t mention here as they are more controversial (okay, I’ll mention them – soy, other processed “milks” and pasteurized milk as well). Perhaps some of you will even drink less alcohol.

Make Your Own Sweet Treats

While it would be best to eliminate sugary treats at least if you make them at home you can avoid among the worst ingredients being used in commercial baking – white sugar, white flour, and trans-fats. You can substitute with raw cane sugar, maple syrup, or stevia for white sugar; you can use organic butter or coconut oil rather than margarine, soybean oil, vegetable oil, or other trans-fats; you can use almond flour, coconut flour, gluten-free or whole wheat flour rather than white flour; and you can use organic pastured eggs.

Among the unhealthiest foods you can consume are white sugar, white flour, and trans-fats which are prevalent in commercial baked goods. While I am not advocating mass consumption of the alternative I suggested, at least it is healthier, and you can control the ingredients.


Alternate Omelets (eggs) and Protein Shakes for Breakfast

As I’ve written in previous articles protein is an extremely important nutrient due to the many functions it serves. While it is presented in the main stream that Americans eat too much protein, the actual truth is that most do not eat sufficient protein. One of the main reasons for this is what our food manufacturers have decided to call breakfast foods – cereals, waffles, pancakes, bagels, muffins, and a whole variety of other processed foods. These products (notice how I won’t call them foods!) are typically all carbohydrate and no protein.

Therefore, to start the day in a healthy manner and to provide your body what it needs, I recommend a breakfast based in protein. Protein shakes made with fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and oils or omelets (eggs and vegetables) are the ideal foods to “break the fast.”

Once again we see two benefits here – one from inclusion and one from exclusion. Inclusion is eating the healthy and body building proteins. Exclusion is not eating high sugar and fat storing carbohydrates.

Three Simple Things You Can Do To Improve Your Health

While you may not be ready to follow my advice 100% of the time (even I don’t follow my advice 100% of the time) here are three simple things you can do which will have profound effects on improving your health and how you feel on a daily basis.


Make Water Your Beverage of Choice

Making water your beverage of choice has two significant impacts. First, most people simply do not drink enough water. Water is essential to life. Our body is made of lots of water and our body utilizes it in many complex chemical reactions that are the basis of life. Of course this leads to the next logical questions – how much and what kind?

How much water should you drink? That will vary with how much water you eat (yes vegetables, fruit, and even meat contain water). My rule of thumb – if you are running to the bathroom every 30 minutes you are probably drinking too much water! What kind of water should you drink? Yes, we hear about the chlorine, fluoride, chemical, industrial waste, antibiotics, and hormone residues in our drinking water supplies; the BPA in the plastic bottles; and all the different kinds of water systems you can have installed in your house (reverse osmosis, oxygenated, etc). It can become overwhelming.

My advice is to just drink water and not necessarily worry about all that stuff. I really don’t think too many people have gotten ill and died from drinking too much water on a regular basis. The heart of the issue is more likely all the other toxins we consume which eventually overwhelms our body’s ability to detoxify itself. Yes, filtered water that you drink from a glass container is probably optimal, but the simple first step is to drink more water.

The second benefit of water as your choice of beverage is that you drink less of other unhealthy choices such as: soda (both diet and regular), fruit juices (yes, even those with “no added sugar” are still loaded with sugar), and some other ones that I won’t mention here as they are more controversial (okay, I’ll mention them – soy, other processed “milks” and pasteurized milk as well). Perhaps some of you will even drink less alcohol.

Make Your Own Sweet Treats

While it would be best to eliminate sugary treats at least if you make them at home you can avoid among the worst ingredients being used in commercial baking – white sugar, white flour, and trans-fats. You can substitute with raw cane sugar, maple syrup, or stevia for white sugar; you can use organic butter or coconut oil rather than margarine, soybean oil, vegetable oil, or other trans-fats; you can use almond flour, coconut flour, gluten-free or whole wheat flour rather than white flour; and you can use organic pastured eggs.

Among the unhealthiest foods you can consume are white sugar, white flour, and trans-fats which are prevalent in commercial baked goods. While I am not advocating mass consumption of the alternative I suggested, at least it is healthier, and you can control the ingredients.

Alternate Omelets (eggs) and Protein Shakes for Breakfast

As I’ve written in previous articles protein is an extremely important nutrient due to the many functions it serves. While it is presented in the main stream that Americans eat too much protein, the actual truth is that most do not eat sufficient protein. One of the main reasons for this is what our food manufacturers have decided to call breakfast foods – cereals, waffles, pancakes, bagels, muffins, and a whole variety of other processed foods. These products (notice how I won’t call them foods!) are typically all carbohydrate and no protein.

Therefore, to start the day in a healthy manner and to provide your body what it needs, I recommend a breakfast based in protein. Protein shakes made with fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, and oils or omelets (eggs and vegetables) are the ideal foods to “break the fast.”

Once again we see two benefits here – one from inclusion and one from exclusion. Inclusion is eating the healthy and body building proteins. Exclusion is not eating high sugar and fat storing carbohydrates.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

February 2013 Newsletter Client Stops Eating Kashi Loses 20 Pounds!

Client Loses 20 Pounds Taking Kashi Cereal out of Diet!

Welcome to February! The month when America realizes the crash diet and heavy exercise program did not result in the weight loss they expected. Of course it is no surprise to me, because I hear that most every day with my client. Just yesterday someone said, “I don’t get it. I’ve been gaining weight since working with my personal trainer.” So, we have to understand two very important facts:

1. Perhaps calories are irrelevant (see more on that later).

2. Stress can be a “trump card” (see below for more on that).

Once we understand this the path is clear. Don’t count calories, but eat healthy food. And, manage your stress levels.

But, what is “healthy” food? If we watch television we know that Kashi is very healthy whole grains. If you’ve read my past writing about breakfast, you’ll remember that to your body Kashi has more sugar than Fruit Loops. (http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2011/07/not-so-healthy-breakfast.html ) A recent new client came to a public talk I gave at the end of last year. She had been down the Weight Watchers road and had done well, yet she hit the plateau. She heard what I said. She stopped eating Kashi. She lost seven pounds the first week. She called me and wanted to learn more. Now, two months later she is down over 20 pounds and was pleased to report this was the first time in 20 years she was below 200 pounds!


Calories Are Bull%%&$ – Why Taking out the Kashi Resulted in Weight Loss

This was the title of a recent workshop I did in Iowa. I think it pretty much sums it up. Here’s the story. It begins with the First Law of Thermodynamics and the Bomb Calorimeter. And it ends with the theory that all calories are created equal. That all makes sense right? We all know that 75 calories from a hard boiled egg and 75 calories from half a slice of toast and 75 calories from a bit of cake will all act the same way in your body. Right? We also know that is you cut out so many calories every week you will lose so many pounds in a certain time period. That means eventually you will disappear?

To read the full story click here: http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/02/calories-not-created-equal-and-perhaps.html

Meet the Trump Card – Stress and Hormones

As mentioned above I’ve had several clients that eat what I consider a healthy diet, yet still cannot lose weight. I’ve even had one client that gained weight on the purification program! That should not be. So, what is going on? Stress!

Quite simply our stress response raises cortisol levels. Cortisol will raise insulin levels and begin a hormonal chain reaction that essentially puts your body in a fat storing mode. You can do all the running and exercise you want, but if your body is in fat storing mode, you will store fat.

Also, your body thinks you are running from a tiger. If you’re running from the tiger you don’t need to digest. Thus, stress impacts your ability to gain all the nutrients from what you eat.

If you want the full list, but be brave, click here: http://brwellness.blogspot.com/search/label/Stress%20is%20Evil

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

The Purpose of Protein

We will begin our discussion of the macronutrients with protein.


What do proteins do in the body? Why are they so important?

Protein provides the structural basis for our body: building and repairing our muscles, ligaments, tendons, organs, glands, nails, hair, blood, hormones, neurotransmitters, cell receptor sites, antibodies, and enzymes.

As you read and learn about what protein does in your body, please consider this question – are you eating enough protein?

Let’s take a closer look at the functions of protein:

Building and repairing muscles, ligaments, and tendons – this is obviously an extremely important function. Building and repairing is a continuous process. One example is exercise. Exercise breaks down muscle and then the body builds newer, bigger, and stronger muscle in its place via the repair process. Protein is essential for a strong body. If you have had a recent injury or are recovering from an injury protein is even more important.

Organs and glands – these are at the basic operating systems of your body. The heart and lungs for breathing and circulation; the stomach, small intestines, large intestines, and pancreas for digestion; the liver for hundreds of functions including keeping the blood clean; the endocrine glands for producing the hormones that regulate and monitor how your body functions. Protein keeps these systems up and running!

Nails and hair – for beautiful glowing hair and robust nails protein is an important ingredient.

Hormones – regulating and controlling all the key processes of your body. This includes blood sugar control, stress response, metabolism, and the menstrual cycle to name a few. Along with neurotransmitters the hormones determine how you feel physically, mentally, and emotionally at any given moment.

Neurotransmitters – neurotransmitters are very important as they keep us mentally sharp and decisive. Quite simply – neurotransmitters give us the ability to be happy, alert, remember, and focus. There are two types of neurotransmitters. Excitatory neurotransmitters energize, excite, stimulate, focus, learn, and remember. Inhibitory neurotransmitters keep us happy, relaxed, and peaceful. As with most areas of life, it is all about balance.

Antibodies – a critical part of our immune system to keep us healthy.

Enzymes – the catalyst to all the chemical reactions in our bodies.

Where does protein come from?

Proteins come from both animal (meat, fish, poultry, milk, cheese, eggs) and plant sources (whole grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds). When we eat protein we are actually consuming amino acids. Different proteins have different amino acid compositions.

Among the amino acids there are nine that are considered “essential.” Anytime you hear the word “essential” in nutrition it means we need to eat that specific nutrient because our body does not manufacture it. Other “essentials” are some fatty acids, Vitamin C, and minerals.

Since our body is constantly building and repairing itself, it requires a constant supply of protein. Therefore I recommend protein be consumed with each meal.

What proteins should I eat?

MEATS: Beef, bison, lamb, veal, lean pork
POULTRY: Chicken, turkey, duck
SEAFOOD: Any fish or shellfish, fresh or frozen
OTHER PROTEINS: Legumes (beans and peas)
NUTS & SEEDS: Nuts and seeds such as: almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, walnuts, pecans, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, raw or dehydrated. Natural nut butters where oil rises to the top – avoid commercial brands (containing hydrogenated oils and sugar).
DAIRY: Eggs, Butter, Cheese, Cottage cheese, Yogurt without added sugar
GRAINS:

· Sprouted grain bread

· Whole grain breads/crackers

· Whole grains – brown rice, quinoa, bulgur, millet, wild rice

· Whole grain cereals, pastas – i.e. oatmeal, health store cereals

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Back to School Nutrition Ideas

In the spirit of “back to school” I thought I’d offer a few thoughts on nutrition for kids. (Of course this advice applies to adults as well.) In all honesty, it is probably the most challenging aspect of my private client practice. While it can be difficult to get adults to eat healthier, kids can be even more so. The food producers and manufacturers have developed special foods that they call “kid’s food”. If you take the time to read the list of ingredients you will find that most of it is not food and should not be consumed by anyone, particularly our children. Our children are growing and need the healthiest foods available to properly fuel their minds and bodies.

The consumption of “kid’s food” and more sedentary lifestyles (lack of exercise, lots of television, computer, and video games) is greatly impacting the health of our youth. Here’s some scary statistics from the CDC. Obesity among children aged 6 to 11 more than doubled in the past 25 years, increasing from 6.5% in 1980 to 17.0% in 2006. The rate among adolescents aged 12 to 19 more than tripled, going from 5% to almost 18%. Keep in mind, before being classified as “obese” there is “overweight” classification, which I have seen estimates between 20 and 25%.

How do we get our kids to eat healthier foods? One successful strategy that I use is to make subtle substitutions to the foods they like to eat. Let’s take something as simple as the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. For the peanut butter use organic peanut butter that is nothing but peanuts and peanut oil. Most commercial peanut butters contain added sugar and hydrogenated oil (trans- fats). We know trans-fats are linked to cancer and that added sugar adds empty calories. I stress the organic because peanuts are one of the most highly pesticided crops, so non-organic peanut butter will contain potential chemical residues and toxins. Ever wonder why there are so many peanut allergies today? For the bread I recommend sprouted bread. It comes in a variety of flavors and is the healthiest bread option. It has more vitamins and fewer calories per slice. However, it is made from wheat so for those with gluten intolerance use another bread option such as flax and millet bread. For the jelly, find the most natural product you can. Look for spreads that do not add sugar or have less sugar added. The fruit already has plenty of sugar.

What are some other healthy substitutions? A major area to look at is the carbohydrates. Our kids eat a lot of them – bread, rice, pasta. Our goal here is to shift from the refined and processed white flour products to whole grains. In addition to the switch to sprouted breads, we can use brown rice instead of white rice and pasta from brown rice rather than refined wheat (the white pasta). All of these substitutions taste virtually the same. They just look a little different and that may turn off the kids. But, covered in tomato sauce they will never know the difference!

Then there are snacks. The kids get home from school and they are hungry and it is not quite dinner time. There are certainly some better choices than chips and dips. Another societal norm is this idea of “snack food.” Just like with “kid’s food” we need a little retraining. What is a snack? It is a small meal. So, think of something healthy that would be part of a meal. It can be a half of a sandwich, one hard boiled egg, a cup of yogurt, some fruit, something spread on a stick of celery, vegetables and dip. There’s nothing special about these foods, except that they are healthy. I like to tell people not to worry about if something is considered “breakfast” food or “snack” food – just eat healthy food when you are hungry!

A valuable resource is the web site www.mequonkids.com. It has lots of great ideas for school lunches and snacks. For more ideas and recipes go to the mequonkids.com web site and click on “Brown Bag Lunch Ideas” or “After School Snacks.”

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He has offices is in Thiensville and Glendale. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

August Newsletter – Looking Good at the Beach?

The Dog Days of August are certainly here and many of us are seeking relief from the heat at our local beaches and swimming pools. While it’s nice to escape the heat, you can’t escape what you see at these places. The obesity epidemic is pretty much staring you in the face. And to “tell it like it is” this is driving disease rates and health care costs to new highs. I just received my health insurance quote for next year. It’s up 19.8% (on top of the 20% last year) and my agent told me that’s not too bad! The insurance company tells me the pool I’m in has seen increasing costs – well it certainly isn’t me, but it doesn’t matter. Too bad we can’t choose our pool. Why can’t I be in the pool with the other healthy people? The unfortunate situation and reality is that regardless of your health, you are being impacted by everyone else’s poor health, and it is driving your costs up. I’ll stop with the politics here and move to the nutrition (which actually has its share of politics too!).

While there are many factors contributing to obesity I believe the biggest is our overconsumption of carbohydrates, particularly in the form of sugar, refined grains, and processed foods. This issue of my newsletter focuses on two areas that directly relate to this – the importance of blood sugar levels and insulin; and starting your day off with a healthy breakfast.

Blood Sugar and Insulin

The bottom line is that to your body all carbohydrates are sugar and if you have too many carbohydrates the sugar is turned to fat. Yes, we use carbohydrates for fuel, but they are meant as short term energy; we use fat for longer term energy. Think of it this way – in your personal fire sugar is like paper. You put it in the fire and it burns up quickly. Fat is like a log – a nice steady burn. When our body is working efficiently it will use the correct mixture and we will be “lean, mean, fighting machines.” Insulin is the hormone that moves blood sugar/glucose from the blood stream into cells for energy or storage. Insulin is essentially a fat storing hormone. Again, a simple equation: too much carbohydrate = too much sugar = increased demand for insulin = fat storage.

One of the major reasons we are consuming too many carbohydrates is because the diet dictocrats have told us that fat is bad for us. If we don’t eat fat, we are left with carbohydrates. While fat was said to be the culprit behind heart disease, strokes, cancer, and diabetes, the actual truth is this is caused by too much sugar (or TMS as I like to call it). For a detailed explanation I link to Gary Taubes’ 2007 article in the New York Times Magazine: What if it’s all been a big fat lie?

http://www.nytimes.com/2002/07/07/magazine/what-if-it-s-all-been-a-big-fat-lie.html

He also has a more recent article called Is Sugar Toxic? Another excellent read. He is the author of the books Good Calories Bad Calories and Why Do We Get Fat?

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/17/magazine/mag-17Sugar-t.html?ref=sugar

I could go on and on about blood sugar and insulin, but since Taubes has written these excellent articles I encourage you to read them. I’ve also recently come across this source https://www.healthambition.com/negative-effects-of-sugar/

Another great source is this YouTube from Merritt Wellness which explains the blood sugar roller coaster. http://www.youtube.com/user/merrittwellness

Avoid the Carb Overload at Breakfast

I’ve written in the past about breakfast. As part of the no-fat campaign we’ve been encouraged to eat the “breakfast foods” – cereal, toast, pancakes, waffles, orange juice, and skim milk – all sugar. Most Americans are starting there day with the blood sugar roller coaster and it continues through the day. Breakfast is the most important meal of the day. We are fueling our bodies for the day after 10-12 hours of no food. You’d think it would want something nutritious. I have two articles on my blog about breakfast – what to eat, what not to eat, and why.

Breakfast foods to avoid:
http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2011/07/not-so-healthy-breakfast.html

Ideas for healthy breakfasts:
http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2011/06/start-your-day-with-healthy-breakfast.html

Designs for Health Supplements Available From My Website

While Standard Process is my number one supplement brand many of my clients also use Designs for Health products – particularly the Paleo line of products as well as CoQ10 and a few others. Designs for Health is a Professional product line and as such are only sold through health care practitioners. You can now purchase these products directly through my web site (Store page) or by following this link: http://brwellness.ehealthpro.com/

I hope you enjoy the rest of your summer!

Bernie

Not So Healthy Breakfast

Previously I described how breakfast is the most important meal of the day and how unfortunately it is a meal that many people tend to skip or short change due to our busy lifestyles. Clients will tell me that they are not hungry in the morning or that they do not have time. We should be hungry in the morning. We have not provided our body with fuel for 8-12 hours, so it should be looking for nourishment to get it going. I have found that not being hungry in the morning is usually part of a vicious cycle of not properly nourishing the body.

Breakfast sets the stage for the day and studies show that “breakfast skippers” are often over weight and/or lack the energy to power them through the day. The previous article included several suggestions for healthy breakfasts. For those of you who missed that article, it is available in its entirety at my blog http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2011/06/start-your-day-with-healthy-breakfast.html

I closed the article with a question, “What’s missing?” There was one specific answer I was looking for which several of you correctly identified. I would like to mention that one caller responded “coffee.” That discussion is for another future article! The specific “food” I was looking for was…cold cereal. I’m sure this may surprise many of you. Want an even bigger surprise – the “whole grain” versions that are now being sold to us as “healthier” may actually be even worse for us! Let me explain.

I’ll start with the basics. Cereals are made from grains. Grains are a carbohydrate. Carbohydrates are essentially sugar. We can call them other things, but at the end of the day, when our body finishes its processing, they are sugar. There is a clever way to know how much sugar you are eating. There is approximately one teaspoon of sugar per four grams of a carbohydrate. So, if you see on the food label that one serving (and are you eating just one serving?) contains 20 grams of carbohydrate, you are eating the equivalent of five teaspoons of sugar.

Cereals are made from refined or processed grains. We’ve talked about this before. The most nutritious parts of a grain are the germ and the bran. These are removed during processing to allow for greater shelf life. The current trend in marketing is to promote “whole grain” cereal. Well, there’s a little spin on that as well. This does not mean all the grains in the cereal are whole, it only means that the main ingredient (that with the largest percentage) is a “whole grain.” Therefore, those that are labeled “whole grain” include a substantial amount of processed grains.

Let’s look at some examples. Here are the ingredients in Cheerios: Whole Grain Oats, Modified Corn Starch, Sugar, Oat Bran, Salt, Calcium Carbonate, Oat Fiber, Tripotassium Phosphate, Corn Starch, Wheat Starch, Vitamin E (Mixed Tocopherols) Added to Preserve Freshness. Each serving has 20 grams of carbohydrate. If you break this down – there are three ingredients – sugar (the grains and the starches), salt, and preservatives. In each serving you get five teaspoons of sugar. What about Special K? You’ll see it is not so “special”. It has 22 grams of carbohydrate per serving from: Rice, Wheat Gluten, Sugar, Defatted Wheat Germ, Salt, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Dried Whey, Malt Flavoring, and Calcium Caseinate. And Frosted Flakes? I’ll spare you the ingredients, but let you know it has 27 grams of carbohydrate per serving – almost seven teaspoons of sugar!

How about the “healthy” cereals? How about one serving of Kashi Go-Lean Crunch with 36 grams of carbohydrates – that’s nine teaspoons of sugar if anyone is counting!

One reader pointed out another item I did not mention – orange juice. Here’s why – one eight ounce glass has 26 grams of carbohydrate – six and a half teaspoons of sugar.

A little more food for thought one serving of skim milk has 13 grams of carbohydrate – another three plus teaspoons of sugar.

Do the math – this “healthy” breakfast of cereal, skim milk, and orange juice can actually be at least fourteen teaspoons of sugar! Not a good way to start the day.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He has offices in Thiensville and Glendale. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Start Your Day With A Healthy Breakfast

I’m sure you’ve heard it before. “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day.” “Don’t skip your breakfast.” Or the old adage, “Eat breakfast like a King and supper like a pauper.” But are you doing it? And if not, why not?

It is true – breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It sets the pace. A healthy breakfast gets the body’s metabolism up and running. Eating an unhealthy breakfast or skipping it and you are more likely to suddenly get hungry and grab quick things that are unhealthy (donuts and candy) or eat extra food at lunch to make up for missing breakfast. It has been documented that breakfast skippers notoriously struggle to lose weight.

Many people think eating less or skipping meals helps them lose weight. This is another one of those “sounds great, but not true” when it comes to nutrition. What actually happens is that the body is designed to adapt to its environment. If it is not being fed on a regular basis, it enters “starvation mode” to preserve nutrients by cutting back metabolism so it can survive longer. This adaption to a slower metabolism is why low calorie diets fail. Once people are off the diet they go back to how they used to eat, but their metabolism has slowed down. The result is adding the pounds right back on. Remember fat cells do two things – they expand and they multiply – they do not go away!

It is important to eat regular meals and if necessary snacks evenly throughout the day. I find the need for snacks is quite individualized. By consistently nourishing your body through the day, blood sugar levels remain more constant and provide balanced energy through the day. With fewer blood sugar spikes you will experience fewer food cravings.

Here are some examples of my favorite healthy breakfasts. Now is a great time to start with my favorite option the breakfast shake. It is summer time and there is lots of fresh fruit to include in your smoothie. Notice that all the choices have protein and healthy fat in the meal. Vary your breakfast so it does not become routine and boring.

1. Breakfast smoothie – Use a high quality protein powder made from whey and/or brown rice. Do not use soy protein powders and watch out for artificial sweeteners. A basic rule of thumb is to not use powders that say all you need to add is water. Use powders which you need to blend with other healthy ingredients such as: plain whole fat yogurt or kefir, one half banana, one cup of fresh or frozen berries (blueberries, strawberries, or raspberries), one tablespoon of flax seed oil or ground flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, and almonds.

2. Some combination of: Yogurt or kefir with fresh or frozen fruit, ground flax seeds, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, almonds. (Basically the smoothie above without the protein powder.)

3. Eggs – hard boiled is best followed by soft boiled or poached. Fried and scrambled are also options but do so at a low temperature and use organic coconut oil, butter, or ghee. You can include vegetables as a side dish or as part of an omelet. I like to sauté leafy green vegetables such as spinach, kale, or chard with onions in coconut oil. Feel free to do eggs 2-3 times per week.

4. Whole grain (please use 100% whole grain products) or sprouted bread toast with butter, ghee, organic natural peanut butter, almond butter, or humus. Limit to 1-2 times per week.

5. If you are really hungry and don’t plan on a mid morning snack you can do a combination of 3 and 4.

6. Steel cut oatmeal, also called Irish Style. These are the real whole oats. You can also add raisins, nuts, seeds, and after cooking, organic maple syrup, or Stevia to sweeten. A cooking tip: On the box it will say to cook for 30 minutes, however if you soak the oats over night in water and even a little yogurt they will cook in about 10 minutes. I’d limit this to 1-2 times per week also.

Now that you’ve read through my suggestions for a healthy breakfast, what do you notice is missing? If you are curious I invite you to give me a call or send an e-mail to find out why I have not included them!

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He has offices in Thiensville and Glendale. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Five Simple New Year’s Resolutions Starters

We now enter an interesting time of year – the Holiday Season. We become festive and at the same time introspective. It can be a time of excess food and drink and yet at the same time we start to ponder our New Year’s Resolution – changes we will make or what we will do differently in the coming year. For many the last thing we want to hear about is how to eat healthier, but why not, that’s what I do! Here’s a few simple suggestions for a healthier New Year, or perhaps you may want to start them now!

1. Start your morning off with a healthy protein shake for breakfast. Please use whey or rice based protein and avoid soy (I’ve written in the past on the dangers of soy protein). This is a great way to get your breakfast protein. Remember we want to have protein with each meal. And, it is a great way to eat some fruit (like a cup of frozen berries) for antioxidant protection and fiber. Berries – blueberries, strawberries, and raspberries have the most antioxidants, but you can also use half a banana, pineapple, mango, cherries, or kiwi. You can even add in some yogurt or kefir for probiotics (the good bacteria) to help your digestion and some ground flax seeds, flax seed oil, or chia seeds for healthy fats.

2. While we’re talking fats – make your own salad dressings from extra virgin olive oil and use it! Mix the olive oil with balsamic vinegar, red wine vinegar, apple cider vinegar, or lemon juice; add some garlic, Dijon mustard, or other spices and you have a very tasty dressing. Have a salad with some chicken or tuna for lunch, or have a side salad with dinner.

3. Eat one organic carrot a day! And I don’t mean a “baby” carrot. You do know there really is no such thing as a baby carrot, right? The carrot has lots of vitamins, minerals and fiber; and if it is organic you don’t even have to peel it. Just wash, eat and enjoy!

4. Eat one serving of leafy greens per day. You can get these in your salad from a variety of lettuces (no iceberg please) or for the most nutrition have kale, chard, mustard greens, collard greens, beet greens, or spinach. Except for lettuce, all the other leafy greens I mentioned are best steamed or sauted to get the most nutrition from them and they tend to taste better, particularly when sauted with garlic and butter!

5. Make home-made soups. As it gets colder our body wants to be warmed and home-made soup is a great way to do it. Start from scratch, if it is beef based or chicken based use the bones! Why does chicken soup have the reputation for healing? Because of all the nutrients (minerals) that leach out of the bones while it is being cooked. Soup is also a great way to get your vegetables in – celery, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, onions, cabbage – and many more all go great in soup. I’ve recently become fond of cooking the soup and for the final touch putting it my VitaMax for a tasty blended soup. That’s a great way to hide the vegetables from the veggie-phobics in the family!

So, there you have it. What do you say? These aren’t too bad are they? Try them out, one or all of them. I can guarantee you’ll be pleased if you do.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Thiensville, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.