Monthly Archives: February 2008

Sea Salt and Iodine Answers

The best salt is unrefined salt. It is light grey, pink, or beige in color. Specific brands to look for include Brittany sea salt, Celtic sea salt, Eden sea salt, Himalayan crystal salt, Krystal salt, and Sea Works unrefined sea salt. The reason that sea salt is good for you is that it is rich in minerals (including iodine) and is alkalizing to the body. The reason the confusion comes up about iodine and salt is during the refining process everything is removed and then iodine is added back. With these natural salts, it is already there!

More on iodine – Iodine is a trace element and an essential micronutrient. Remember that the term “essential” means our body does not make it, we have to ingest it. Iodine is needed for endocrine efficiency, normal growth, and cellular function. It is used in making the thyroid hormones of thyroxine and triidothyronine. We need it in small amounts, but the body can not store it, so we need to consume it on a regular basis.

The best sources of iodine are sea foods (particularly cold water deep sea fish), unrefined sea salt, kelp and other sea weeds, fish broth, butter, pineapple, artichokes, asparagus, and dark green vegetables. Certain vegetables (that contain “goitrogen”) actually block iodine absorption. These foods should be cooked. They include broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, kale, peanuts, rutabaga, soybeans, turnips, and watercress. In addition flouride and chlorine block iodine receptors in the thyroid. The B vitamins aid thyroid function.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He is an expert in the field of Nutrition and Erectile Dysfunction. His office is in Thiensville, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Sugar…By Any Other Name

Following is a list of sugars and corn products commonly found in packaged foods. Corn products are included because they break down quickly into sugar.

Barley malt
Blackstrap molasses
Brown sugar
Cane sugar
Citric acid
Corn meal
Corn starch
Corn sweeteners
Corn syrup
Confectioner’s sugar
Cyclodextrins
Date sugar
Dextrin
Dextrose
D-mannose
Evaporated cane juice
Fructose
Fruit juice concentrate
Glucose
High fructose corn syrup (HFCS)
Honey
Invert sugar
Lactose
Lactic acid
Malt syrup
Maltodextrin
Maltose
Mannitol
Maple syrup
Modified and unmodified starches
Molasses
MSG
Raw sugar
Sorbitol
Sucrose
Syrup
Table sugar
Turbinado sugar
Xantham gum

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He is an expert in the field of Nutrition and Erectile Dysfunction. His office is in Thiensville, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

What is Lacto-Fermentation?

Prior to refrigeration, freezing, and canning machines food was preserved through the process of lacto-fermentation. Lactic acid is a natural preservative that inhibits putrefying (bad) bacteria. Starches and sugars in vegetables and fruits are converted into lactic acid by the many species of lactic-acid producing bacteria (lactobacilli). These are present on the surface of all living things and especially numerous on leaves and roots of plants growing near the ground.

The proliferation of lactobacilli in fermented foods enhances their digestibility and increases vitamin levels. These beneficial organisms produce their own numerous helpful enzymes as well as antibiotic and anticarcinogenic substances. Lactic acid also promotes the growth of healthy flora in the intestine.

Lacto fermented foods normalize the acidity of the stomach. Lactic acid helps break down proteins and aids their assimilation by the body.

Examples of a lacto-fermented food include raw sauerkraut (cabbage), kimchi, beet kvass, kefir, and sourdough breads.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He is an expert in the field of Nutrition and Erectile Dysfunction. His office is in Thiensville, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

What is Kefir?

Kefir is a fermented food made from milk. It is rich in beneficial yeast and bacteria. These friendly micro-organisms play an important role in our digestion, help balance our “inner ecosystem” and are useful in building immunity or regaining health. Kefir contains minerals and essential amino acids including: tryptophan (relaxing effect on nervous system), vitamin B12, vitamin B1, and vitamin K. It has a tart taste, similar to drinking yogurt.

Without sufficient friendly bacteria and yeast (also called “flora”), the “unfriendly” ones take over our system causing poor digestion and limiting our absorption of nutrients. This leads to nutrient deficiencies and is expressed through a variety of symptoms including headaches, depression, skin rashes, food allergies, joint and muscle pain, menstrual irregularities, digestive problems, environmental sensitivities, and other immune related disorders.

Kefir is different from yogurt in that it contains beneficial yeast and bacteria. Yogurt contains only beneficial bacteria.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. He is an expert in the field of Nutrition and Erectile Dysfunction. His office is in Thiensville, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.