Monthly Archives: November 2012

Cut the Carbs

Carbs are great for energy, right?

Carbohydrates are one of the more controversial of the macronutrients. You will see heated debates illustrating the benefits of both low carbohydrate diets and high carbohydrate diets. The Standard American Diet (SAD) has become a high carbohydrate diet. Many experts believe this has fueled the current health crisis and the rising rates of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. These experts prefer a diet based more on protein and fat.

We use carbohydrates for energy. They provide quick energy. Carbohydrates are converted into blood glucose which feeds our brain and red blood cells. Ever notice how irritable you get when hungry? The brain does not operate very well without nourishment. When we need energy our brain lets us know!

So, no argument whether or not we need carbohydrates. The critical point is how much of our diet should be devoted to carbohydrates, what the source of the carbohydrate should be, and what other forms of energy are available to us.

We have two main options for energy: carbohydrates and fat. When it comes to providing energy for our body each does it differently. Think of a fire. A carbohydrate is like a piece of paper. You put it in the paper and it burns up quickly and to keep the fire burning more paper is needed quickly. Fat is like a log. It burns smoothly, steady, and for a much longer period of time. What can we conclude? Carbohydrates will certainly help us in the short term, but for sustained energy over the long term fat is the fuel of choice.

If you find your energy levels going up and down all day with blood sugar highs and crashes then you are likely fueling yourself primarily with carbohydrates. If you find your energy levels smooth and even throughout the day you are likely getting a good mixture for your body and activity level.

What carbohydrates are best for me?

When most of us think carbohydrate we think grains, breads, and sweets. They are not the only choice. Vegetables and fruits contain carbohydrates as well.

Remember this simple equation. To your body: CARBOHYDRATE = SUGAR! That’s all you need to know. If we consume lots of carbohydrates (like 60% or more of our diet as recommended by the USDA) we consume lots of sugar. While sugar can be used for energy, excess sugar is converted into fat and stored and has many adverse affects on the body. The bottom line – it is sugar (excess carbohydrates) that makes us fat! The experts that I referenced above recommend that carbohydrates be approximately 30-40% of your daily calories and no more than 150 grams per day. If you are looking to balance blood sugars and lose weight they will go as low as 60 grams per day.

For a more complete look at the dangers of excess sugar I recommend this web site: http://nancyappleton.com/ and particularly this page: http://nancyappleton.com/141-reasons-sugar-ruins-your-health/.

The best source of carbohydrates is VEGETABLES. They can be eaten as raw or steamed, preferably the lower carbohydrate vegetables (leafy greens, broccoli, and cauliflower) with two meals per day and snacks. It is best to limit the starchy vegetables (potatoes, yams, corn, squash, and peas) to 3-4 times per week. Raw vegetable salads and soups are another great source and can be consumed daily.

It is best to practice balance and moderation of grains and fruits. It is best to limit grains to 1-2 times per day maximum. If you are trying to lose weight, even less than that is appropriate. The best grains are: sprouted grain bread: such as “Ezekiel”; whole grain breads/crackers; whole grains – brown rice, quinoa, bulgur, millet, wild rice; and brown rice pasta. Fruits should be limited so that fructose consumption is less than 25 grams per day.

When using sweeteners it is best to stick with the following: Stevia (a natural sweetener); raw honey; and pure maple syrup.

The carbohydrates to avoid as best as possible (hopefully there is nothing surprising in this list!): refined/white flour; refined/white grains; cookies, cakes, pastries; white sugar, brown sugar, all sweeteners not listed above; processed refined grain cold and hot cereals; and all artificial sweeteners.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

November 2012 Newsletter – What Your Finger Nails Are Telling You

Last month we looked at what your blood may be telling you. This month we’ll look at the finger nails. You all know I am a big fan of Standard Process supplements. I use them for myself, my family, and my clients. The reason is simple – they work. I’ve published testimonials from many clients in past newsletters and my web site. Now I have my own to add to the list. And it has to do with finger nails. See below for the details.

I’m getting settled in at my new office at Well Body (10040 N. Port Washington Road in Mequon) and loving it. We offer acupuncture, massage, reiki, skin care, personal coaching, nutrition, and have just added an infrared sauna. Feel free to stop by and say hi! For a quick overview of our practitioners click here http://www.wellbodymequon.com

I’ll be hitting the road next month with stops in Cedar Falls, Iowa and Minneapolis. For more details click here http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/05/2012-events.html

Take a Look at Your Finger Nails

Continuing education is important to me. I often listen to recorded lectures made available through Standard Process. I first became aware of the information concerning nails that I will share with you from one of these lectures. Based on that information, I was concerned with what I witnessed in my own nails.

I’ve always had cold hands and feet and could never figure out quite why. You are probably asking what does cold hands and feet have to do with finger nails. Here’s the answer. If you take a look at your nails there is the white moon-shaped part at the base of the nail. This is called the lunulae because it looks like the moon. The general accepted theory is that healthy people have between 8 and 10 of these, at least 4 on each hand. They should be neither too large nor too small.

To learn more about what your finger nails may be telling you click here http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/11/learn-from-your-nails.html

Needless to say, I was surprised to see I was sub-optimal. I made a call to the workshop presenter to seek some advice. There is still work to do, but in three months on his recommended supplement protocol I have progressed from five lunulae to now a seventh beginning to appear. I’ve also noticed that my hands and feet seemed to be less cold. An interesting observation – since I spent a lot of time looking at my finger nails. The lunulae change during the day! As the sixth one was coming in it would be there a little, then I couldn’t see it, and then it would be back. Now it is here to stay.


We Are What We Eat

Every now and then it is important to return to the fundamentals. Whether we are hearing something for the first time or it is a familiar concept, each time we engage it supports our understanding. With that in mind I am writing a series of articles to review the fundamentals of nutrition. We will look at the big picture, then break it down into its components, and take a closer look at how our body works and how we nourish it.

The first article in the series looks at the “big picture.” Follow this link http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/10/we-are-what-we-eat.html


The Purpose of Protein

This is the second article in the series. We begin with protein – the nutrient that builds our body. It is also a nutrient that I believe most people under-consume.

What do proteins do in the body? Why are they so important?

Protein provides the structural basis for our body: building and repairing our muscles, ligaments, tendons, organs, glands, nails, hair, blood, hormones, neurotransmitters, cell receptor sites, antibodies, and enzymes.

For the remainder of the article click here http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/10/the-purpose-of-protein.html

Happy Thanksgiving

As we head into the holiday season may it be a safe and healthy one for all. It is a challenging time to be optimally healthy. We all tend to eat and drink more than we believe we should. Do your best and make the best choices.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Learn From Your Nails

Continuing education is important to me. I often listen to recorded lectures made available through Standard Process. I first became aware of the information concerning nails that I will share with you from one of these lectures. Based on that information, I was concerned with what I witnessed in my own nails.

I’ve always had cold hands and feet and could never figure out quite why. You are probably asking what does cold hands and feet have to do with finger nails. Here’s the answer. If you take a look at your nails there is the white moon-shaped part at the base of the nail. This is called the lunulae because it looks like the moon. The general accepted theory is that healthy people have between 8 and 10 of these, at least 4 on each hand. They should be neither too large nor too small.

So, what does the absence of lunulae or smaller than normal indicate? It may be a sign of deficiency in cellular oxygen levels. This kind of deficiency can cause the symptoms I was suffering from – cold hands and cold feet – and in some cases a general numbness in select body parts (fortunately I did not have this). Less than eight lunulae is a sign of poor circulation.

Research has indicated that people who have between 3 and 7 lunulae may also be fatigued, numbness, and memory loss in addition to the previously mentioned symptoms.

Another warning sign is someone who has two large lunulae on their pinkies. This may be a sign of an overworked heart. This person may be more likely to have high blood pressure and heart disease.

A person with no lunulae often suffers from anemia, depression, and low blood pressure. When the lunulae are oversized and quite large this person may be at risk for a stroke.

Needless to say, I was surprised to see I was sub-optimal. I made a call to the workshop presenter to seek some advice. There is still work to do, but in three months on his recommended supplement protocol I have progressed from five lunulae to now a seventh beginning to appear. I’ve also noticed that my hands and feet seemed to be less cold. An interesting observation – since I spent a lot of time looking at my finger nails. The lunulae change during the day! As the sixth one was coming in it would be there a little, then I couldn’t see it, and then it would be back. Now it is here to stay.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.