Monthly Archives: December 2012

Fabulous Fats

Everybody knows that fat is bad for you. Right?

Well, not exactly. It is fat that has been most unjustly demonized. We have been suffering from a low fat craze for the last twenty years. Everybody (well not really everyone!) has been convinced that fat is bad for us and should be avoided at all costs. So what has happened? We got fatter! Obesity rates are going through the roof.

So yes, we need fats. They make up cell membranes and hormones, are required for absorption of the fat soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K), are critical for infant brain development and the female reproductive system, and provide energy. Ever wonder why everyone seems to have a Vitamin D deficiency these days? Perhaps because they are not consuming the right fats for Vitamin D metabolism.

There are two types of fats – saturated and unsaturated (further defined as monounsaturated and polyunsaturated). One of the easiest ways to tell them apart is that saturated fats are solid while unsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature. Unsaturated fats are much more sensitive to oxygen, light and heat.

This sensitivity underlies the critical nature of fat you need to understand. When fats are heated or exposed to excess light and oxygen they oxidize. It is dangerous when we consume oxidized fats. Oxidation leads to inflammation which damages cells and is linked to a variety of diseases including heart disease.

Saturated fats are able to withstand greater temperatures before oxidation occurs. The most susceptible fats to oxidation are the unsaturated fats, particularly the polyunsaturated ones such as vegetable oil, corn oil, soybean oil, canola oil, and cottonseed oil. Note that margarine is made from various combinations of these oils.

Therefore, when cooking with fats and oils we want to use saturated fats such as butter, clarified butter (ghee), or coconut oil. For salad dressing or other room temperature uses olive oil is best.

Another fat we hear of are trans-fatty acids. These are formed during the process of hydrogenation. Hydrogenation is used to “stabilize” vegetable oils so they will not oxidize and was initially developed to lengthen shelf life of processed foods.

In the hydrogenation process polyunsaturated oils, usually corn, soybean, safflower, or canola, are heated to high temperatures and injected with hydrogen atoms. During the heating process the nutrients in the oils are destroyed, the oils become solid and have oxidized.

Trans-fats have been linked to many ailments, including cancer, heart disease, and reproductive problems. Trans-fats are commonly found in commercial baked goods, cookies, crackers, margarines, vegetable shortenings, and processed dairy products.

What fats should I eat?

Your sources of healthy fat include: butter (and please use organic butter); extra virgin olive oil, virgin coconut oil, fish oils, fresh flaxseed oil or ground flax seeds; and chia seeds.

Additional sources of healthy fats, although best to practice balance and moderation of these foods: eggs; nuts and seeds such as almonds, cashews, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, etc. (Please note that nuts and seeds are best raw and then dehydrated); dairy foods such as cheese, cottage cheese, and yogurt without added sugar (I recommend that all dairy be organic).

Avoid the following foods as they contain trans-fats and oxidized oils: margarine (yes, even the “smart” products); vegetable oil; corn oil; soybean oil; canola oil; safflower oil; and sunflower oil.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

Decmeber 2012 Newsletter – Happy Holidays and More About Your Nails!

Happy Holidays!

Happy Holidays!! Hard to believe another year has almost passed. The Holiday Season – the time no one wants to talk to me about what they are eating – just kidding!! Actually I’m as busy as I’ve ever been at this time of year. As I settled into my new office I have enjoyed a record November! The new location is wonderful as are all the practitioners at Well Body.

In the spirit of the holidays my offer for a free blood chemistry analysis will continue through the end of January. This is a half hour consultation to review your results. To provide you with additional incentive I am passing along a special offer from Direct Labs – $59 for the Comprehensive Wellness Profile. The published lab prices for this are over $500. This is an awesome deal. Follow this link: https://www.directlabs.com/ShoppingCart/tabid/2146/language/en-US/Default.aspx

With the Holiday Season I’ll keep this month’s newsletter short and sweet!


Watch The Carbohydrates – Especially During the Holiday Season

Carbs are great for energy, right? And during the holidays we need energy!! Well, we need to be careful. My overall advice is to “cut the carbs” and here’s why:

Carbohydrates are one of the more controversial of the macronutrients. You will see heated debates illustrating the benefits of both low carbohydrate diets and high carbohydrate diets. The Standard American Diet (SAD) has become a high carbohydrate diet. Many experts believe this has fueled the current health crisis and the rising rates of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes. These experts prefer a diet based more on protein and fat. To read the rest of the story click here: http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/11/cut-carbs.html

More on Nails

Last month’s article on nails was very well received with several inquiries. The nails are great because for the most part they are quite visible. We can see what is going on. There is much we can learn from what we can see on the body. I will be continuing this theme in the next several newsletters.

Back to the nails.

The condition of your nails, colors of the nails and nail bed, as well as shape of the nails can be indicative of specific nutrient deficiencies or organs under stress.

Here are some common indicators of nutrient deficiencies:

Are your nails soft, tear or peel easily, and have opaque white lines? This may be a PROTEIN deficiency.

Are your nails dry, brittle, and break easily? Do they have horizontal or vertical ridges? This may be a CALCIUM deficiency. (Be aware that sometimes dry and brittle nails may be caused by excessive exposure to solvents, detergents, nail polish, and nail polish remover.)

To keep reading this article click here: http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/12/learn-from-your-nails-part-2.html

Wishing all the Happiest and Healthiest of Holiday Seasons!

Bernie

Learn From Your Nails – Part 2

Last month’s article on nails was very well received with several inquiries. The nails are great because for the most part they are quite visible. We can see what is going on. There is much we can learn from what we can see on the body. I will be continuing this theme in the next several newsletters.

Back to the nails.

The condition of your nails, colors of the nails and nail bed, as well as shape of the nails can be indicative of specific nutrient deficiencies or organs under stress.

Here are some common indicators of nutrient deficiencies:

Are your nails soft, tear or peel easily, and have opaque white lines? This may be a PROTEIN deficiency.

Are your nails dry, brittle, and break easily? Do they have horizontal or vertical ridges? This may be a CALCIUM deficiency. (Be aware that sometimes dry and brittle nails may be caused by excessive exposure to solvents, detergents, nail polish, and nail polish remover.)

Are your nails thin, flat, or spoon-shaped? Do you have white or yellow nail beds? This may be a sign of IRON deficiency.

Do you have white spots or bands on your nails or in the nail bed? This may be a sign of ZINC deficiency.

Do you have a yellow nail bed? Do your nails not grow or grow very little? This may be a VITAMIN E deficiency.

Do you have darkened nail beds? This may be a VITAMIN B12 deficiency.

Impaired circulation to the extremities may also contribute to any of the above conditions. Another concern may be digestion. If you remember from my digestion and hydrochloric acid article (http://brwellness.blogspot.com/2012/05/importance-of-hydrochloric-acid.html), sufficient HCl is essential for proper absorption of calcium, iron, zinc, and B12.

Here are some common indicators of organs under stress:

Do your nails have red circular spots or are they narrow? This may be a sign of stress on the heart.

Are your nails brittle or break easily or have shoot like growths? Are they blackish or yellow? This may be a sign of low functioning thyroid.

Do your nails have ridges and easily tear or split? This may be a sign of adrenal weakness, particularly if you are under a lot of stress.

Are your nails very short and wide? That may be a sign of infertility.

Do your nails have dark lines that move with growth of the nail? That may be a sign of internal bleeding.

Are your nails triangular shaped? That may be a sign of rheumatoid arthritis.

Do you have white nail beds or white coloration near the cuticle with dark coloration near the tip? This may indicate liver or kidney stress.

Are your nails clubbed and convex? This may indicate respiratory issues.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.