Category Archives: Women’s Health

Newsletter April 2019: The Wonderful Weston A. Price Foundation

I have decided to devote this newsletter to the wonderful work of the Weston A. Price Foundation. I am one of the Co-Directors (with Susan Wichman and Laurie Meyer) of the Ozaukee/Washington County Chapter. The Foundation provides a plethora of helpful information on current topics affecting our health.   While the original work of Dr. Price focused mainly on food, the Foundation has expanded its areas of interest to include environmental issues, pesticides, vaccinations, and other controversial topics.

As we know good health starts at the farm or ranch with healthy soil and healthy animals. The Weston A. Price Foundation helps citizens find food from chemical-free and pasture-based farms through its local chapter system.

The Foundation provides support to farmers who raise produce and pasture-fed meat, eggs, and dairy products.

All the information that the foundation provides is evidence-based.

For a quick review of the work of Dr. Weston A. Price click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1289

Click here for the Weston A. Price Foundation website: https://www.westonaprice.org/

I strongly urge you to become a member of the Foundation. For just $40 per year you receive a quarterly journal Wise Traditions with all their latest articles of interest. All the Journals are available online, but donations are still helpful and appreciated! Here’s a link to the Journals: https://www.westonaprice.org/category/journal/

Below are a few of the highlights from the most recent Wise Traditions, Winter 2018. I trust you will find them entertaining and enlightening!

The Crowd’s Dietary Wisdom

This may be my favorite article from this issue. The author, Tom Naughton, explains why we should listen to crowds, not experts! You will see how the “experts” believe they now best what is good for you and how they manipulate the uninformed to follow their point of view.

Several years ago, he directed the documentary Fat Head which I definitely encourage you to watch.

To read this article click here: https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/abcs-of-nutrition/the-dietary-wisdom-of-the-crowd/

Sunscreens: The Dark Side of Avoiding the Sun

This is another excellent article, especially as the weather (finally) turns warm. In this article Elizabeth Plourde enlightens us on the chemicals and nanoparticles in sunscreens. The widespread use of sunscreens has resulted not only in increased skin cancers but in contamination of the world’s water sources.

When Susana and I were in Australia at the Great Barrier Reef it was mandatory to wear a full wet suit when going in the water. The reason stated was to protect the reef from all the sunscreen. The chemicals are killing the ocean life. Makes you wonder what they might be doing to us!

To learn more click here: https://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/environmental-toxins/sunscreens-the-dark-side-of-avoiding-the-sun/

Vaccinations

This is probably the one of the most divisive health issues confronting society today.  Whatever your view may be, I would recommend you to take a look at the Foundation’s new flyer devoted to this topic. It is a fact-based approach to the discussion looking at Myths and Facts about vaccinations, how to best build immunity, best practices if forced to vaccinate, and known harmful ingredients that are in vaccinations. Click here for the Vaccination Flyer: https://www.westonaprice.org/wp-content/uploads/VaccineFlyer2019.pdf

Who is Dr. Weston A. Price and What is the Weston Price Foundation?

I originally wrote the base of this article several years ago. Since then our local Chapter of the Weston Price Foundation is thriving and I believe his work and that of the Foundation is more important than ever. While the original work of Dr. Price focused primarily on food, he was interested in everything that impacts human health. The Foundation has expanded its areas of interest to include environmental issues, farming, pesticides, vaccinations, and other topics. It provides a plethora of helpful evidence-based information on current topics affecting our health.  I strongly encourage you to learn more about the Weston Price Foundation at www.westonaprice.org.

I am often asked by my clients or after a group presentation, “So, what do you eat?”  My answer – I follow the dietary guidelines of Weston Price.  Which of course leads to the next question, “Who is Weston Price?”

Weston A. Price was a pioneer in the world of nutrition.  He was a dentist from Cleveland, Ohio who lived from 1870-1948.  In the 1930s he began to notice an increase in cavities and crooked teeth in his patients.  Dental caries (cavities) happen to be the most basic form of disease common in humans, and often the first experienced.  Teeth come in crooked and/or crowded due to deformed dental arches causing insufficient space in the mouth for the teeth to come in correctly.

His mission – to discover what was causing the degeneration in dental health he was witnessing.  Coincidently, he repeatedly heard stories of isolated peoples in distant lands who supposedly had no cavities and perfectly straight teeth.  If this were so, then what he was experiencing in his practice could possibly be the result of nutritional deficiencies and not inherited genetic defects (the prevailing thought of the time).

Over the next ten years he traveled around the world to every continent (except Antarctica).  And what did he find?  When native people ate their traditional foods there were no cavities and perfectly straight teeth.  However, here’s what makes the study fascinating.  This was a time when our Western processed foods were just beginning to creep into these native cultures.  “Foods” such as canned milk and vegetables, white flour, and sugar were being introduced to those natives who wished to “modernize.”  This is critical because it allowed similar genes to be analyzed based on the nutritional quality of the diet.  What he found was that as the native people adopted a Western diet, they had more cavities and crooked, crowded teeth.  The more they abandoned their native diet, the worse their teeth were.  His travels are documented in his classic book Nutrition and Physical Degeneration.  It contains many pictures and stories about what he encountered along the way.

The next question was – how did these diets differ?  What was in the native food that was not in the Western food?  Since he traveled all over the world he saw a wide variety of diets.  There were Eskimos that ate almost exclusively animal products; there were others who ate more grains and vegetables.  As a side note, he did not find any native diet that was strictly vegetarian; they all relied upon some animal foods for survival.

He took samples of their foods and brought them back to the United States to be analyzed.  What he found was that the diets of the isolated peoples in comparison to that of the American diet of the day contained at least four times the water soluble vitamins, calcium and other minerals, and at least TEN times the fat-soluble vitamins from animal foods such as butter, fish eggs, shellfish, organ meats, eggs, and animal fats! 

The specific nutrients in these foods are the fat soluble vitamins A and D, along with one that wasn’t yet identified.  Price called it “Activator X”, which we now understand is vitamin K.  These fat soluble vitamins are vital to health as they act as catalysts for mineral absorption and protein utilization.

For more information about our Ozaukee County Chapter or to be added to our e-mail list to be notified of future events e-mail us at wapfozwash@gmail.com

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

March 2019 Newsletter: March Madness – What’s the Right Diet for Me?

While filling out your NCAA Tournament Bracket can be challenging, nothing can be more maddening than trying to figure out your optimal diet. There are so many options and opinions, all claiming to be the best! The truth is that we are all different – different genes, different histories, different life circumstances, different metabolisms – and all these factors affect our health and what is the best diet for you. As a base line it is important to eat clean and healthy food, but after that the mixture of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats is not going to be the same for everyone.

One of the latest trending diets is the Keto Diet. At first all we heard was the successes, but now more and more nutritionists are writing about how it is not the perfect diet for everyone. In this month’s feature article, I offer my thoughts on the subject. See below for “To Keto or Not…That is the Question.”

Susana and I are just back from our trip to Australia. It was one of the most beautiful places we have visited. Charming cities, breath-taking landscapes, and wonderful people. If it is not on your bucket list you may want to reconsider!

Exciting news: I am making this one-time special offer for new clients to save $100 on their initial consult if they are referred by existing clients or readers of this newsletter! This offer is good for the month of March only. This is a great time for you to remind your loved ones, friends, and colleagues that you have encouraged to make an appointment, that NOW is the time!

To Keto or Not…That is The Question

It seems everybody is talking about the Keto Diet. You may have tried it yourself, or you may know someone who has tried it. It may have worked great or not. Any outcome is possible, as with all diets it is critical to remember we all have different body chemistries and what works for one could be difficult for someone else.

In this article we will look at the history of the Keto Diet, the positives, the negatives, and why it may or may not work for you. For the rest of the article click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1282

Additional Sources for Keto Diet Information

Here’s some additional sources for information on the Keto Diet:

This is one of my favorites that I have linked to in the past: https://www.dietdoctor.com/

This one from Harvard gives you the mainstream take on it, so I find that interesting: https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/should-you-try-the-keto-diet

Here’s from Mr. BulletProof: https://blog.bulletproof.com/keto-diet-beginners-guide/

And here’s a couple from Ann Louise Gittleman: https://annlouise.com/2019/01/08/is-keto-actually-your-kryptonite-why-keto-doesnt-work-for-everyone/

And https://annlouise.com/2018/03/13/the-ketogenic-diets-fatal-flaw-the-con-of-going-keto/

And one last blog from James Templeton: https://unikeyhealth.com/blogs/health-keys/keto-craze-or-cure

Success Story – GI Upsets No More

“I have been suffering with GI upset for years and could never figure out what the problem was. I tried giving up certain foods that I thought were the source of the problem however I continued to run to the bathroom after almost every meal. I had seen a few doctors and they just kept telling me it was IBS and sent me on my way but I was still suffering and wanted an answer. I was referred to Bernie by a friend and boy am I glad I saw him! He figured out that I had a mold that was causing the upset as well as a few foods that I was sensitive to that I ate pretty frequently. After only a few short months of taking supplements and avoiding dairy and cashews I actually forgot that I used to have any digestion problems in the first place! Even my friends and family have noticed the difference! I am now eating the right foods for my body, taking supplements to get rid of the mold, and I am no longer going to the bathroom 5-6 times a day!”  K.T.

To Keto or Not…That is The Question

It seems everybody is talking about the keto diet. You may have tried it yourself, or you may know someone who has tried it. It may have worked great or not. Any outcome is possible, as with all diets it is critical to remember we all have different body chemistries and what works for one could be difficult for someone else.

In this article we will look at the history of the keto diet, the positives, the negatives, and why it may or may not work for you. For more information on the keto diet, I recommend the website www.dietdoctor.com.

Like most trendy diets, the keto diet is not new. The concept has been around for many years (it was designed in 1923 by Dr. Russell Wilder at the Mayo Clinic for the treatment of epilepsy) and was initially found to be helpful in reducing seizures in children. Studies have shown it to reduce the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Others have used it as an anti-cancer diet. The current trend is focused on weight loss.

The keto diet is a low carbohydrate, moderate protein, high fat diet. By limiting carbohydrates, the body will enter the metabolic state of ketosis, meaning it is breaking fat into ketones to meet its energy requirements. It uses these ketones (instead of the glucose from carbohydrates or protein) as its source of energy. Protein is also restricted as it can be converted into glucose which would take you out of ketosis. A typical ratio of nutrient consumption based on 2000 calories a day might look like 165 grams of fat, 40 grams of carbs, and 75 grams of protein. This is approximately 75% of calories from fats, 20% from proteins, and 5% from carbohydrates. Naturally, this will vary by person, but the key point is the high fat.

Those successful on the keto diet will lose weight and will report feeling fuller with fewer cravings, while boosting their mood, mental focus and overall energy. Like most diets, the keto diet presents the challenge of staying on the diet, in this case meaning to stay in ketosis. In order to do so you must maintain the ratio of nutrients that keep you in ketosis.

Those not successful will struggle on the diet and report low energy, stomach upset, and flu-like symptoms. Why does this happen? Two main reasons: an increase in toxicity and a challenged or missing gallbladder.

An increase in toxicity can occur when fat cells release stored toxins. We store toxins in our fat cells. As our body accesses the fat for energy these toxins are released into the blood stream. If there is not additional support for the detoxification organs (liver and kidneys) this toxicity produces the symptoms of the “keto flu” – nausea, vomiting, constipation, diarrhea, stomach ache, headache, irritability, weakness, muscle cramps and soreness, dizziness, poor concentration, difficulty sleeping, and sugar cravings.

The second point may be even more critical – a challenged or missing gallbladder. Despite what is often presented in the mainstream, the gallbladder is a very important organ. The gallbladder plays a critical role in the digestion of fats. The gallbladder stores and releases bile that is used to emulsify fats so they can be digested. Bile also alkalizes the small intestine, removes fat soluble toxins, and supports pancreatic digestive enzymes. So, it is obvious that if your gallbladder has been removed or it is under stress, you will not digest fats which will also product symptoms mentioned above as the “keto flu.” For more information on the gallbladder I suggest you read my article, The Liver, Gallbladder, and Pancreas – Behind the Scenes Helpers of Digestion found athttps://brwellness.com/?p=121

However, all is not lost! There are supplements that may help prevent the “keto flu.” There are a variety of detoxification support and bile products that may provide enough support for your body.

The keto diet is not for people with chronic health conditions.  It can stress the heart and kidneys and some people may become dehydrated.

Being on the keto diet long term may be challenging, especially limiting carbohydrates. If you are not careful you can find yourself out of ketosis which means the weight loss will stop. Remember the keto diet is high in fat, not protein. If you eat too much protein your body will convert the excess into glucose which will also take you out of ketosis.

The most important point to remember from all of this is that we are all different. There is no single diet that is right for everyone. There are certain fundamentals that are true. We all need clean sources of food – proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. I believe it is also universal that everyone will benefit from eating more organic vegetables and consuming less sugar and avoiding artificial sweeteners and trans-fats.

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

February 2019 Newsletter: Two of the Biggest Threats to Your Health

Winter is here! Today has been a snow day here in Milwaukee. I have been working from home, catching up on e-mails, talking to out-of-state clients, and rescheduling all my in-town clients. We’ve had about 7-10 inches of snow and more seems to be coming. The below zero weather comes later in the week. Needless to say, Susana and I are looking forward to our two-week trip to Australia coming up!

Per my earlier e-mail – the office will be closed beginning February 2 and I will be back the afternoon of February 19. I’m sending out this newsletter a few days early so that if you need supplies you will still have time to get them before I go. Please let me know as soon as possible so we can schedule a pick up.

This newsletter will be brief and will focus on what I believe are two of the major threats to our collective health: the coming rollout of 5G technology and glyphosate (the active ingredient in RoundUp).

Dangerous Substance #1: 5G

The new cell phone technology called 5G is beginning to be rolled out nationwide. The good news is it will be very fast and enable all kinds of new and amazing technology breakthroughs. The bad news is it may threaten your health. From what I have been hearing I have many concerns about the potential negative health effects from its deployment.

Here are some articles for you:

20000 Satellites 5G To Be Launched http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/20000-satellites-5g-be-launched-sending-focused-beams-intense-microwave-radiation?

Citizens Concerned About 5G http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/citizens-arms-against-5g-wireless-technology-roll-out-are-their-concerns-justifie?

While 5G is the latest technology, there are also concerns about EMFs which I have shared in the past. Here’s a great video from Nick Penault he calls EMF 101: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEHx6d7jpHQ

Dangerous Substance #2: Glyphosate

Glyphosate. Ever heard of it? Probably not. So, let me introduce it to you – it is the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup®. The more I learn about it, the more I am concerned. The more I learn about it, the more I am convinced that it may be the number one enemy of good health and the main pathway to so many of the modern diseases we now experience. And if nothing else, it is a great reason to eat organic.

For the rest of the article click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=16

Client Success Story: Natural Supplements to Reduce Period Symptoms

“Thanks to Bernie and his supplement help, my period and period symptoms have become extremely tolerable.  I went from taking 5+ Advil each day due to awful period cramps and body fatigue. After seeing Bernie for about 1 month, I have decreased my Advil intake during my period to only 2 throughout my whole cycle.  I have never been on birth control before because I hated the thought of it and what it could do to my body.  This process has been better than even the thought of birth control to control my period and every changing hormones.” C.S

January 2019 Newsletter: Happy New Year – Let’s Make 2019 Your Healthiest Year Ever!

Happy New Year – Let’s Make 2019 Your Healthiest Year Ever!

With the New Year our thoughts turn to our annual New Year’s resolutions. This year let us all resolve that 2019 will be our healthiest year ever! We will do what we need to do – eat healthier, exercise more, and engage in activities that reduce our mental and emotional stress.

This may seem like a lot to do. My advice is to do what you can. Create success that builds on success. The path to be your healthiest self involves multiple steps. Take them one at a time and keep moving forward!  One of the best ways to be successful is to have a partner or partners walking the path with you. Share your successes; motivate and support each other when you struggle.

An even more significant resolution may be to help someone else become healthier in 2019. Many of you mention a friend or loved one that you would like to come see me. Now is the perfect time to encourage them to set up an appointment. Let us make 2019 the healthiest year ever for everyone we know!

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This newsletter has the final installment of the articles overviewing the macronutrients. See below for Fabulous Fats!

Did you overdo it during the Holiday Season? Looking for a cleanse or detoxification program? If so, see the article below on what type of program is best for you.

Fabulous Fats!

In this final installment of articles overviewing the macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate, and fat) we complete the picture with fat. Everybody knows that fat is bad for you.  Right? Well, not exactly.  It is fat that has been most unjustly demonized.  We have been suffering from a low-fat craze for the last thirty years.  Everybody (well not really everyone!) has been convinced that fat is bad for us and should be avoided at all costs.  So, what has happened?  We got fatter!  Obesity rates are going through the roof. 

For the rest of the article click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1262

In case you missed them, here are the previous articles:

For the overview article click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1202

For the article on protein click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1215

For the article on carbohydrates click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1251

What’s Right for You?

This is the time of the year when we re-focus on our health. There are a couple of reasons for that. First, it is a New Year, so it is time to make changes – eat better, exercise more, and lose weight. Second, many of us recognize the Holiday Season took its toll. We notice a few extra pounds, an overall sensation of not feeling our best, and it seems we’re either getting sick or fighting off a cold or flu. Then the natural human desire to feel better takes hold.

We look for a solution, something to make us feel better. This is typically some type of “diet” or “weight loss program” or “cleanse.” There are many programs to choose from, but the important question is what is best for you. In determining that you need to understand the different types of programs available.

I classify programs into three main categories: purification or detoxification programs, gut purification programs, and weight loss programs.

For the rest of the article click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1104

Fabulous Fats

In this final installment of articles overviewing the macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate, and fat) we complete the picture with fat. Everybody knows that fat is bad for you.  Right? Well, not exactly.  It is fat that has been most unjustly demonized.  We have been suffering from a low-fat craze for the last thirty years.  Everybody (well not really everyone!) has been convinced that fat is bad for us and should be avoided at all costs.  So what has happened?  We got fatter!  Obesity rates are going through the roof. 

So yes, we need fats.  They make up cell membranes and hormones, are required for absorption of the fat soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K), are critical for infant brain development and the female reproductive system, and provide energy.  Ever wonder why everyone seems to have a Vitamin D deficiency these days?  Perhaps because they are not consuming the right fats for Vitamin D metabolism.

There are two types of fats – saturated and unsaturated (further defined as monounsaturated and polyunsaturated).  One of the easiest ways to tell them apart is that saturated fats are solid while unsaturated fats are liquid at room temperature.  Unsaturated fats are much more sensitive to oxygen, light and heat. 

This sensitivity underlies the critical nature of fat you need to understand.  When fats are heated or exposed to excess light and oxygen they oxidize.  It is dangerous when we consume oxidized fats.  Oxidation leads to inflammation which damages cells and is linked to a variety of diseases including heart disease.

Saturated fats are able to withstand greater temperatures before oxidation occurs.  The most susceptible fats to oxidation are the unsaturated fats, particularly the polyunsaturated ones such as vegetable oil, corn oil, soybean oil, canola oil, and cottonseed oil.  Note that margarine is made from various combinations of these oils.

Therefore, when cooking with fats and oils we want to use saturated fats such as butter, clarified butter (ghee), avocado oil, or coconut oil.  For salad dressing or other room temperature uses olive oil is best, followed by flax oil, pine nut oil, sesame oil or hempseed oil.

Another fat we hear of are trans-fatty acids.  These are formed during the process of hydrogenation.  Hydrogenation is used to “stabilize” vegetable oils so they will not oxidize and was initially developed to lengthen shelf life of processed foods.   

In the hydrogenation process polyunsaturated oils, usually corn, soybean, safflower, or canola, are heated to high temperatures and injected with hydrogen atoms.  During the heating process the nutrients in the oils are destroyed, the oils become solid and have oxidized. 

Trans-fats have been linked to many ailments, including cancer, heart disease, and reproductive problems.  Trans-fats are commonly found in commercial baked goods, cookies, crackers, margarines, vegetable shortenings, and processed dairy products. 

A very important classification of fats are the essential fatty acids, specifically Omega-3’s and Omega-6’s. These are polyunsaturated fats (so remember you do not want to heat them to high temperatures). We need all the essential fatty acids. The issue (like much of nutrition) is balance. The essential fatty acids are the precursors to prostaglandins – a form of hormones that support many functions including normal growth and the inflammatory response. They also assist in blood coagulation and circulatory functions.

Omega 6’s are generally considered “pro-inflammatory” while Omega 3’s are “anti-inflammatory.” Too much inflammation is linked to many chronic diseases, yet at the same time, our body requires inflammation as a normal function. Our body was designed to consume the Omega 3’s and 6’s in relatively equal amounts (you’ll see anywhere from 1:1 to 2:1 Omega 6’s to 3’s in the nutrition literature). Unfortunately, many Americans are in the 20:1 to 50:1 ratio. Why? Omega 6’s are found heavily in grains which we eat and feed to our animals and form the base of these diets.

Many of us have been encouraged to increase our consumption of Omega 3 essential fatty acids (found in fish oil).  These are EPA and DHA which are beneficial to the nervous system and the cardiovascular system.  They are important for normal growth of our blood vessels and nerves.  Omega 3’s have been found to decrease blood clotting, lower triglyceride levels, decrease blood pressure, and reduce inflammation in the body. 

Omega 6’s are equally important. The specific Omega-6 oils to consume include linoleic acid (LA), alpha-linoleic acid (ALA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). These fats are known to fire up your metabolism, enhance cell membrane structure and function, and synthesize eicosanoids.

If you want to learn more details regarding the Omega 6’s I strongly encourage you to ready Ann Louise Gittleman’s latest book Radical Metabolism which I have highlighted recently on my blog and in recent articles concerning healthy lifestyle and weight loss.

I recommend you eat these foods for healthy fat (organic preferred):

  • Butter
  • Extra Virgin Olive Oil
  • Virgin Coconut Oil and MCT Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Fresh Flaxseed oil or ground flax seeds
  • Hemp/hempseed oil
  • Chia seeds
  • Additional nuts and seeds: almonds, cashews, walnuts, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame, hemp – raw or dehydrated
  • Grass-pastured meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy (avoid dairy if lactose sensitive)
  • Wild caught cold water fish

Best sources of the essential fatty acids include: black current seed oil, evening primrose oil, flaxseed, lecithin, linseed oil, seafood (halibut, salmon, scallops, shrimp, snapper, and tuna), sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, walnuts, wheat germ, and winter squash.

Avoid these foods (the trans-fats and oxidized oils):

  • Margarine and other trans-fats
  • Vegetable oil, corn oil, soybean oil, canola oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil
  • Any highly processed and/or GMO oils

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

December 2018 Newsletter: Happy Holidays and Pearls of Wisdom from Ann Louise Gittleman

Happy Holidays!! My best wishes to you and your family for a Happy and Healthy holiday season. Happy Hanukkah, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year!!

I recognize this is a busy time of year so I’m keeping this month’s newsletter short and sweet.

During my November Open House we were joined by Ann Louise Gittleman who discussed the “radical” in her new book Radical Metabolism and we were treated to a spontaneous half hour question and answer session with her. She shared several pearls of wisdom which are highlighted below.

Let us continue to look at the key macronutrients. This month we look at carbohydrates. The amount of carbohydrates to have in our diet is probably the most controversial question of nutrition.  You will see heated debates illustrating the benefits of both low carbohydrate diets and high carbohydrate diets.  See below and form your own opinion!

And last but not least is a link to my website to learn more about the dangers of EMFs.

Enjoy!

Pearls of Wisdom from Ann Louise Gittleman

At my Open House a couple of weeks ago we discussed Ann Louise Gittleman’s latest masterpiece Radical Metabolism. We were blessed to have Ann Louise join us live via Skype. She reviewed the key concepts which make her new approach to healthy eating “radical” and then we were treated to a thirty-minute Q & A session. Ann Louise offered a few pearls of wisdom which I will share below.

To learn what makes Radical Metabolism so radical and to enjoy these five pearls of wisdom (Pearl #1 – Iron and Ferritin, Pearl #2 – The Importance of Cookware, Pearl #3 – Tea and Coffee, Pearl #4 – Bitters, and Pearl #5 – Grapefruit) click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1247

Cut the Carbs

In this third installment of articles overviewing the macronutrients ((protein, carbohydrate, and fat) we turn our attention to carbohydrates. The amount of carbohydrates to have in our diet is probably the most controversial question of nutrition.  You will see heated debates illustrating the benefits of both low carbohydrate diets and high carbohydrate diets.  The Standard American Diet (SAD) has become a high carbohydrate diet.

To read the full article click here: https://brwellness.com/?p=1251

The Latest on EMFs

We hear a lot these days on the dangers of EMFs. I urge you to learn more information from this recent article on my website. https://brwellness.com/?p=1242

 

Cut the Carbs

In this third installment of articles overviewing the macronutrients (protein, carbohydrate, and fat) we turn our attention to carbohydrates. The amount of carbohydrates to have in our diet is probably the most controversial question of nutrition.  You will see heated debates illustrating the benefits of both low carbohydrate diets and high carbohydrate diets.  The Standard American Diet (SAD) has become a high carbohydrate diet.

Yes, we use carbohydrates for energy.  They provide quick energy.  Carbohydrates are converted into blood glucose (blood sugar) which feeds our brain and red blood cells. Ever notice how irritable you get when hungry?  The brain does not operate very well without nourishment.

However, carbohydrates are not the only source of energy. Fat (as will be detailed in the next article) also provides energy. When most of us think of carbohydrates we think grains, breads, and sweets.  They are not the only choice.  Vegetables and fruits contain carbohydrates and roughly 30% of protein converts to carbohydrates.

Remember this simple equation.  To your body: CARBOHYDRATE = SUGAR!  That’s all you need to know. If we consume lots of carbohydrates (like 60% or more of our diet as recommended by the USDA) we consume lots of sugar.  While sugar can be used for energy, excess sugar is converted into fat and stored and has many adverse affects on the body.  The bottom line – it is sugar that makes us fat!

Not only does sugar (excess carbohydrates) contribute to weight gain, after a time insulin resistance occurs. Insulin is the hormone produced by the pancreas to move the excess sugar out of the blood stream. When the body can no longer keep up with sugar consumption it will become insulin resistant. This condition blocks the burning of fat, causes fat storage around the abdomen, and causes inflammation. Inflammation creates another long list of possible symptoms. Unless there are dietary changes, the next steps are pre-diabetes, diabetes, and according to some experts, Alzheimer’s.

Here are some of the various consumption guidelines for carbohydrates. As I stated previously in the article and you will see there is quite the variation! The USDA/Federal Government’s 2000 calorie per day diet includes 300 grams of carbohydrates, the American Diabetes Association recommends about 150 grams of carbohydrates per day for diabetics, while alternative/holistic practitioners will recommend about 50-60 grams per day. Many holistic practitioners have found their clients blood sugar levels come into balance at that level of carbohydrate intake.

So, to gain control over your carbohydrate consumption, I recommend you eat these foods for carbohydrates:

  • VEGETABLES
  • Raw or steamed vegetables, preferably low carbohydrate veggies (leafy greens, broccoli, cauliflower) with two meals per day and snacks
  • LIMIT starchy veggies (potatoes, yams, corn, squash, peas) to 3-4 times per week
  • SALADS: Raw vegetable salads

 

Practice balance and moderation of these foods:

  • GRAINS (Limited quantities ONLY – once per day maximum):
  • If you are gluten sensitive or intolerant you must avoid all gluten containing grains and foods. It is best to consume only organic grains to avoid pesticides.
  • Sprouted grain or sourdough bread.
  • Whole grains – brown rice, quinoa, bulgur, millet, and wild rice.
  • Use brown rice or quinoa for pasta.
  • FRUITS:
  • SWEETENERS: Not advised at all.  But if you must, limit to limited amounts of the following
  • Stevia (a natural sweetener)
  • Raw Honey
  • Pure Maple Syrup

 

Avoid these foods as best as possible:

  • Refined/White flour
  • Refined/White grains
  • Cookies, cakes, pastries
  • White sugar, brown sugar, all sweeteners not listed above
  • Processed refined grain cold and hot cereals
  • All artificial sweeteners

 

While it would be ideal not to eat the foods listed on the avoid list, I recognize reality.  So, since most people will continue to eat these foods, it is even more important to consume the foods listed as healthy!!

Bernard Rosen, PhD is a Nutrition Consultant and Educator. He works with individuals, groups, and at corporations to create individualized nutrition and wellness programs. His office is in Mequon, WI. To learn more or to schedule an appointment, e-mail at bernie@brwellness.com, call (262) 389-9907 or go to www.brwellness.com.

 

Pearls of Wisdom from Ann Louise Gittleman

This past week at my Open House we discussed Ann Louise Gittleman’s latest masterpiece Radical Metabolism. We were blessed to have Ann Louise join us live via Skype. She reviewed the key concepts which make her new approach to healthy eating “radical” and then we were treated to a thirty-minute Q & A session. Ann Louise offered a few pearls of wisdom which I will share below.

Let’s start with what makes Radical Metabolism so radical. As usual, Ann Louise is rewriting the rules of nutrition. Even with all the efforts to eat clean, avoid gluten, and drinking lots of bone broth and Kombucha, we still struggle with our overall health. The book discusses the use of specific foods to drive digestion and metabolism, support the gall bladder and thyroid, burn fat and strengthen muscles. You learn how to reduce exposure to toxins that are in some of the popular “healing” foods and to clean up your kitchen. If you are interested in nutrition and care about your long-term health, I urge you to read this book! To order your own copy click here: RADICAL METABOLISM

Pearl #1 – Iron and Ferritin

Ann Louise discussed how excess iron may be at the root of a variety of health problems. Her advice is to get your ferritin level checked. Ferritin is a measure of stored iron in your blood. It is different than the basic iron level that is typically done in a blood test. “Normal” ranges for men are 20 to 500 nanograms per milliliter and for women 20 to 200 nanograms per milliliter. As you well know, “normal” does not mean “healthy.” Ann Louise recommends ferritin levels less than 100. Where do we get excess iron and ferritin from? We get excess iron from meat, cookware, and iron fortified foods.  Coffee, wine, and dairy BLOCK iron absorption furthering the problem.

Pearl #2 – The Importance of Cookware

Ann Louise stressed while what we eat is very important, just as critical is how we cook our food! She advises to avoid aluminum in all forms. Do not use aluminum foil in cooking, use parchment paper instead. Do not use aluminum in cookware and you need to be aware that aluminum is often hidden in cookware such as stainless steel. Pure stainless steel is fine. She explained a simple test to check your cookware. Use a magnet – if the magnet sticks it is pure. Aluminum is non-magnetic, so the magnet will not stick if aluminum is in the pot.

Here’s some brands and types of cookware she recommended: Saladmaster for stainless steel; Romertopf for glazed clay; and Le Creuset for enameled covered cast iron.

Pearl #3 – Tea and Coffee

One of the biggest surprises of the night was Ann Louise’s response concerning green tea! She stated that it and other conventional teas, such as black, white, and green (non-herbal) accumulate fluoride. The only form of tea she liked was Oolong.

Coffee was also discussed. This is another topic where you get a variety of opinions from nutrition experts. Ann Louise believes there are many health benefits to coffee, particularly to charge the metabolism. It is important to recognize that some people cannot handle caffeine. You may be one of them, such as I am. She does place limits on daily consumption and the sources. Coffee must be organic, and she recommended Purity Coffee as the cleanest available.

Pearl #4 – Bitters

A key part of charging your metabolism is the use of bitters to aid digestion. She advised they be consumed 20 minutes before a meal. To learn more about bitters please read the book.

Pearl #5 – Grapefruit

To charge metabolism and fuel weight loss Ann Louise recommended to each ½ of a pink grapefruit before each meal.